Citizenship

ROULLA

Registered User
#1
Bureaucratic Delays in Processing Citizenship Force Head of Government to Act
June 17, 2016

The Head of Government and Justice Minister have called for the implementation of legal measures to speed up decisions on Tunisian citizenship and immigration.

During a meeting yesterday, Head of Government Habib Essid met with Justice Minister, Omar Mansour to discuss speeding up the process by which decisions on Tunisian citizenship are made, as well introducing a degree of flexibility into those statutes that dictate it be stripped from those committing crimes overseas.


Habib Essid Photo Credit:Tunisia Live

Bureaucratic delays in the processing of any official request have long been a source of frustration for many Tunisians, with absenteeism in the public sector reported to be near epidemic proportions, prompting the President to remark earlier this year that Tunisians simply didn’t want to work.

According to the Tunisian Nationality Code, citizenship is extended to any child born of a Tunisian parent within Tunisia. Similarly, citizenship can also include any child born to foreign parents who have been resident within the country for more than five years at the time of the child’s birth. Moreover, foreign women married to Tunisian men are also eligible to apply for citizenship. However, foreign men who have married Tunisian women must wait for the five year period before applying as would any other applicant.

Similarly, the code also covers stripping citizenship from those convicted of serious crimes, principally war crimes, overseas or having behaved in manner considered against the “Tunisian quality” while in a foreign country.

Speaking to Tunisia Live, Attorney and counselor at Law, Rashid Gaied said that the principal cause in delays in processing requests or in making decisions stemmed from the Ministry’s generally low level of productivity, rather than the absence of any proposed legal measure to speed decision making up. “It would probably be fair to say that the administration needs to improve its performance overall, especially with regard to the rapid and efficient in handling of case files.

“The amount of time it currently takes for the bureaucracy to process individual each files is regulated by the code.” Gaied said; “It makes little sense for the Head of Government to talk about introducing legal mechanisms to ‘facilitate’ gaining Tunisian nationality, because the conditions are set out very clearly within the nationality code. Ultimately, this rests with the Ministry of Justice.”
 

Scottochott

Well-Known Member
#2
Gosh this article encapsulates many problems with the state and the Tunisian psyche, could be applied to most of the issues of state as well as on an individual level ...

Many don't want to work / low productivity even when they do / complicated bureaucracy / time it takes to get anything done / etc. Oh and don't forget endemic corruption. Yet somehow manages to retain a naive charm!
 

ROULLA

Registered User
#3
Tunisian citizenship are made, as well introducing a degree of flexibility into those statutes that dictate it be stripped from those committing crimes overseas.

Similarly, the code also covers stripping citizenship from those convicted of serious crimes, principally war crimes, overseas or having behaved in manner considered against the “Tunisian quality” while in a foreign country ”
These two paragraphs are quite hypercriticle considering those that do have a criminal record are allowed a visa to travel abroad. Where there's a way, there's a will. It all depends on who you know ;)not what you know:)
 
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Scottochott

Well-Known Member
#4
[QUOTE="ROULLA, post: 327788, member: Tunisian citizenship are made, as well introducing a degree of flexibility into those statutes that dictate it be stripped from those committing crimes overseas.

Similarly, the code also covers stripping citizenship from those convicted of serious crimes, principally war crimes, overseas or having behaved in manner considered against the “Tunisian quality” while in a foreign country ”
These two paragraphs are quite hypercriticle considering those that do have a criminal record are allowed a visa to travel abroad. Where there's a way, there's a will. It all depends on who you know ;)not what you know:)[/QUOTE]

As I said, the corruption bit was missed out, and seems religious hate crime will not be sufficient to count. It doesn't seem to address what will happen to those Tunisian nationals stripped of citizenship, will they be denied re-entry to the country?
 

Rosewater

Active Member
#5
These two paragraphs are quite hypercriticle considering those that do have a criminal record are allowed a visa to travel abroad. Where there's a way, there's a will. It all depends on who you know ;)not what you know:)
Those who have crminial record should have a second chance in life , why you want to lock them???
 

ROULLA

Registered User
#6
Those who have crminial record should have a second chance in life , why you want to lock them???
Everyone deserves a second chance in life, I agree. What I don't agree to however is when people have a criminal record for something far more than a petty crime... Also remember that convicts serving time for serious crimes were pardoned during the revolution.
Everyone is entitled to their opinion.
 

Aslemma

Well-Known Member
#7
I agree with you in principle Roulla. However, whilst those guilty of serious crimes can and should be barred from entry to other countries, to strip them of citizenship of their home country would leave them stateless, doomed to be 'on the run' for ever. I don't know the answer. Prison for long periods sounds like a good idea, but prisons are often a university for criminals to learn further criminal skills.
 

ROULLA

Registered User
#8
I agree with you in principle Roulla. However, whilst those guilty of serious crimes can and should be barred from entry to other countries, to strip them of citizenship of their home country would leave them stateless, doomed to be 'on the run' for ever. I don't know the answer. Prison for long periods sounds like a good idea, but prisons are often a university for criminals to learn further criminal skills.
Morning Aslemma, hope you are getting there! I agree with everything you have said.
 

Aslemma

Well-Known Member
#9
Hello Roulla, I certainly feel a lot better than I did, but still not fit enough to tackle Sousse. Believe me, I'm not interested in dancing all night, or walking into PEK, but I do want to be able to walk round the medina or go to the local supermarket. I have now set my heart on going back in October/November so am keeping my fingers crossed. ☺ I won't, however, book anything until this b***** sciatica has cleared up. How are you keeping? I do hope you and your family are keeping well. xxx
 

Scottochott

Well-Known Member
#10
Hello Roulla, I certainly feel a lot better than I did, but still not fit enough to tackle Sousse. Believe me, I'm not interested in dancing all night, or walking into PEK, but I do want to be able to walk round the medina or go to the local supermarket. I have now set my heart on going back in October/November so am keeping my fingers crossed. ☺ I won't, however, book anything until this b***** sciatica has cleared up. How are you keeping? I do hope you and your family are keeping well. xxx
Hi Aslemma, my mum has been suffering from sciatica for over a year, the GP was useless and just gave her painkillers which upset her stomach. She tried a few different physios and has now found one she's happy with. It has made a big difference and now goes just once a month and has been given some stretching exercises to do at home. May be worth a try if you haven't already, hope it clears up soon.
 

ROULLA

Registered User
#11
Hello Roulla, I certainly feel a lot better than I did, but still not fit enough to tackle Sousse. Believe me, I'm not interested in dancing all night, or walking into PEK, but I do want to be able to walk round the medina or go to the local supermarket. I have now set my heart on going back in October/November so am keeping my fingers crossed. ☺ I won't, however, book anything until this b***** sciatica has cleared up. How are you keeping? I do hope you and your family are keeping well. xxx
Hi Aslemma, we are all okay thank you!
I understand, it wouldn't be much of a holiday whilst in pain. Fingers crossed that everything goes to plan and that you are able to go in the month's of your choice x x
 

Aslemma

Well-Known Member
#12
Thanks Scott, though the news that your poor mum has been suffering for over a year isn't encouraging and certainly hasn't improved my mood. :( The doc referred me to a physio at the hospital who has sent me a few exercises in the post, which may be why it seems a bit easier now,

I did tell her that I hadn't got a lot of faith in physios, as the one I had after breaking my elbow simply told me to work through the pain when I told her it didn't feel right. I was then sent for hydrotherapy and the young man doing this said it didn't look right and suggested I had another x-ray. This showed the bones were further apart than when I first broke it and there was a lot of gunk in between them. :(
 

Scottochott

Well-Known Member
#13
Thanks Scott, though the news that your poor mum has been suffering for over a year isn't encouraging and certainly hasn't improved my mood. :( The doc referred me to a physio at the hospital who has sent me a few exercises in the post, which may be why it seems a bit easier now,

I did tell her that I hadn't got a lot of faith in physios, as the one I had after breaking my elbow simply told me to work through the pain when I told her it didn't feel right. I was then sent for hydrotherapy and the young man doing this said it didn't look right and suggested I had another x-ray. This showed the bones were further apart than when I first broke it and there was a lot of gunk in between them. :(
Unfortunately my advice would be forget the nhs and go private, £30-40 per session I'm afraid, but having seen the pain and possible relief I think it's worth it. No quick easy solution I fear, it really is a nasty condition.
 

Aslemma

Well-Known Member
#14
There is a problem with that suggestion Scott - I don't drive!! As I live on a hill and can't walk as far as the bus stop at present, unless i was able to get there on my trusty mobility scooter, or one of the family took me by car, I simply couldn't get there. Over the past year they have had far too much time off work running me around and I don't want them to have any more.
 

Scottochott

Well-Known Member
#15
There is a problem with that suggestion Scott - I don't drive!! As I live on a hill and can't walk as far as the bus stop at present, unless i was able to get there on my trusty mobility scooter, or one of the family took me by car, I simply couldn't get there. Over the past year they have had far too much time off work running me around and I don't want them to have any more.
Oh sorry, no easy answer. You could probably get someone to do a home visit, but costs may be prohibitive. I know how you value your independence, and being a burden is an awful prospect though I'm sure your family would dispute that definition. My limited knowledge would recommend stretching but probably best to be guided by a health professional, I'd hate to make it worse. Mr Google may have some advice but again professional advice preferable. I hope things get better, in the meantime excuse my smile at an image of you zooming around on your Harley Davidson;)
 

Aslemma

Well-Known Member
#16
in the meantime excuse my smile at an image of you zooming around on your Harley Davidson;)
Oh yes indeed. Slow speed to get out of my sideway then full throttle. Mind you, driving it on our pavements is almost as much fun as a fairground ride and nothing like the cost. :)

The exercises I have been given are stretching so I will persevere with them. My family get cross because I don't ask for help very often, but as you say I've always liked to be independent.
 
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