Tunisia has the highest divorce rate

ROULLA

Registered User
#1
Apparently Tunisia has the highest divorce rate in the Arab world.

 

ROULLA

Registered User
#2
Tunisia has the highest divorce rate in the Arab world, with around half of all marriages ending in divorce. This report follows the lives of three very different families to see how they cope with the consequences.

"Why do you keep strangling yourself? Is it because mum and dad got divorced? Everyone gets divorced", says 10-year-old Kusay's grandmother. The reason most often given for Tunisia's high divorce rate is the country's Personal Status Code, a set of laws designed to promote women's rights. Chedli Al-Rahmeni is the judge in charge of divorce cases at the Ariana Court in Tunis. He's seen thousands of couples wanting to separate, and knows the impact it has on their children. "Many of them pass through Tunis' Ariana court at least twice. First during their parent’s divorce, and then again when they react by breaking the law.
 

Mezoo

VIP Member
#3
It's because the Tunisian men are just so nice...
 

ROULLA

Registered User
#4
There are many Tunisia men that are lovely..
You can't pick all nice apples from the same tree, some of them have to be rotten.
Here, in Tunisia and all over the world.
It doesn't mean that it's the man's fault, there are plenty Tunisian women that are also rotten.
It doesn't matter where you are from, there is good and bad all over the world.
 

Aslemma

Well-Known Member
#5
It's possibly partly because it's easier for a woman to divorce her husband in Tunisia than it is in other Arab countries. Although the situation is far from perfect, women have more rights and protection there than elsewhere. A man still has a legal responsibility to support her and the children (though some obviously don't do this) and any money earned by the wife or brought into the marriage by her remains her property. This is obvously of more help to educated ladies who are able to work, but these are less likely to be found in certain other parts of the Arab world.
 

salimlov

Active Member
#6
the answer is easy tunisian men cant afford the financial requirements that tunisian girls ask for hhhh and second reason is that some tunisians are nasty with their wifes specially those who drink all the time and turn rude to their wifes and beats them,
 

ROULLA

Registered User
#7
the answer is easy tunisian men cant afford the financial requirements that tunisian girls ask for hhhh and second reason is that some tunisians are nasty with their wifes specially those who drink all the time and turn rude to their wifes and beats them,
Hi Salimlov Hope that you are well!

Yes, there are some nasty men out there BUT there are some nasty women out there too, it's just like anywhere in the world.
And as for Tunisian men not being able to keep up with the women's requirements, have you ever wondered why?
I can only think of one word and it's MATERIALISTIC:confused:

Don't get me wrong everyone likes having nice things but when you get married the priest or whoever must say a few words that are something in the line of
To love, to hold,to cherish, for richer and poorer in sickness and in health, til death us we part...
Something along those lines anyway

The women in Tunisia get given a dowry their parents buy them sheets or whatever they can afford from when they are young . By the time they get married they've got all or most of what they need. In Nabeul everything is placed in a truck and loads of people go around tooting to show what they've got :D
The husband has to have built a room, house, palace or whatever you want to call it, as long as it's shelter...

Now if you're talking about things like a MUST HAVE like a Louis Vuitton bag or a Gucci watch then to me these are materialistic things. People who want these ESSENTIALS need to get up and go and work for them.

I'd rather have a one bedroom shelter, food for my kids and know that I have enough to survive on and be happy, any day. Then have everything and be miserable..

The problem is that nowadays people get married like it is some sort of fashion without thinking it out, which is really sad.
Like anything, people need to take thing's slow, I weren't going to just shack up with my now husband because I thought he was nice.. I played hard to get, I wanted respect and I earnt it the same way he also earnt it from me.

It takes two too tango but both party's have to want to make it work. Everyone has their ups and downs otherwise you wouldn't be normal.
Some men are really nasty, I've seen it with my own eyes how they disrespect their wives, but I can also say that there are loads of women who are bloody greedy. You don't need 10 gold bangles and get money from your future husband as a gift, isn't one or two bangles enough.

And the way that people talk to each other amazes me
Man...... Ya Mra ziarne

Women.... hetttt flous

Sorry about spelling

They have no manners, no please , no thank you..how is a marriage like that supposed to work is beyond me
Sorry rant over ;)
 
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Moonsky

Member
#8
Very interesting, thanks Roulla. Tunisian children are though, not unlike others the world over who suffer in these circumstances especially when divorce has been proceeded by abuse.

It is not surprising though, given that there are many men here who are treated at home like spoilt little princes. So, when things don't go their way they turn abusive. Their general attitude is one of incredible immaturity.

On the other side, some of the women are overly-demanding, totally unable to do anything for themselves, drain the good men dry of money and energy and this leads to a very imbalanced marriage pumped full of resentment.

Mostly though, it's hardly surprising given that for many, future spouses are chosen by the family. It is viewed as a contractual and financial arrangement (like Medieval times) and love never enters into the discussions.

I've lost track of the number of times I've asked Tunisian men "do you love your wife" and the reply is either

"I respect my wife"
"Yes I suppose so as we've had many years in the same house"

hardly makes your heart burst with romance does it??!!

For me it's always interesting to get the male opinion on things. There are many older Tunisian guys I've chatted to who are dutiful, pay for everything rah rah for wives that they neither chose for themselves or loved prior to marriage. Infact, one such guy (age 42) was pressurised into marrying a cousin (quelle suprise!) when the love of his life was an American divorcee. He accepted her children; his family said they would never welcome her or her children into their life/home/family. Now married to a cousin, produced the much wanted son and guess what? Got a job that takes him out of Tunisia for 8 months of the year....

I just feel sorry for anyone whom society forces them along a path of emptiness and unhappiness.
 

scotty_bambam

Well-Known Member
#9
Very interesting, thanks Roulla. Tunisian children are though, not unlike others the world over who suffer in these circumstances especially when divorce has been proceeded by abuse.

It is not surprising though, given that there are many men here who are treated at home like spoilt little princes. So, when things don't go their way they turn abusive. Their general attitude is one of incredible immaturity.

On the other side, some of the women are overly-demanding, totally unable to do anything for themselves, drain the good men dry of money and energy and this leads to a very imbalanced marriage pumped full of resentment.

Mostly though, it's hardly surprising given that for many, future spouses are chosen by the family. It is viewed as a contractual and financial arrangement (like Medieval times) and love never enters into the discussions.

I've lost track of the number of times I've asked Tunisian men "do you love your wife" and the reply is either

"I respect my wife"
"Yes I suppose so as we've had many years in the same house"

hardly makes your heart burst with romance does it??!!

For me it's always interesting to get the male opinion on things. There are many older Tunisian guys I've chatted to who are dutiful, pay for everything rah rah for wives that they neither chose for themselves or loved prior to marriage. Infact, one such guy (age 42) was pressurised into marrying a cousin (quelle suprise!) when the love of his life was an American divorcee. He accepted her children; his family said they would never welcome her or her children into their life/home/family. Now married to a cousin, produced the much wanted son and guess what? Got a job that takes him out of Tunisia for 8 months of the year....

I just feel sorry for anyone whom society forces them along a path of emptiness and unhappiness.
Yes your description of the men/ boys being treated like little princes I can totally relate to.my husband had only been here 5 weeks and acts like he's single.he said "all my life my mother didn't tell me what to do,so you can't control me", this in response to me saying i wanted us to spend the evening together,as due to work we hardly see each other.
 

Shazza100

Active Member
#10
Yes your description of the men/ boys being treated like little princes I can totally relate to.my husband had only been here 5 weeks and acts like he's single.he said "all my life my mother didn't tell me what to do,so you can't control me", this in response to me saying i wanted us to spend the evening together,as due to work we hardly see each other.
aw that's quite sad for you, what did he have planned instead? Is he trying to make friends here perhaps? Or was he just trying to make a point?
 

Trulymadlydeeply

Well-Known Member
#11
Need to nip it in the bud scotty. If he will not compromise on something as simple as spending the evening together what about any big decisions...
 

Scottochott

Well-Known Member
#12
Symptomatic of many Tunisian men I know, they don't really spend time at home with their partner, preferring to be out in coffee shops or restaurants with their friends. This is just one of many cultural differences, often stemming from the way they view marriage, often more of a contractual relationship as Moonsky says. Wives are often viewed as baby makers and home makers, and they get their fun elsewhere as there is no real love in the relationship. This is why so many relationships break down when the Tunisian husband gets to the west, their primary motive wasn't love and they don't understand what a western wife expects.

A sweeping generalisation I know, and some relationships are based on a more loving model, but they definitely seem to be the minority unfortunately.
 

Rosewater

Active Member
#13
Apparently Tunisia has the highest divorce rate in the Arab world.

I wonder why the showed the worst part in tunisia??
hate to live in that place , what a sh*thole!!!
 
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June

Active Member
#14

sass

Active Member
#15

scotty_bambam

Well-Known Member
#16
aw that's quite sad for you, what did he have planned instead? Is he trying to make friends here perhaps? Or was he just trying to make a point?
He stayed late at the pub he works, yes making friends.but I do 60 hr weeks and he's doing ever changing shifts that include weekend's, he'd already had a day out on his day off,so I naturally assumed when I got home at 8.15 that he'd want to spend the 2 hours before bedtime with me,but no.
 

scotty_bambam

Well-Known Member
#17
Need to nip it in the bud scotty. If he will not compromise on something as simple as spending the evening together what about any big decisions...
Truly ,I don't know this person.he's changed so much.I understand needing male company,homesick etc,but he keeps telling me we will be OK because I will change!
 

sass

Active Member
#18
He stayed late at the pub he works, yes making friends.but I do 60 hr weeks and he's doing ever changing shifts that include weekend's, he'd already had a day out on his day off,so I naturally assumed when I got home at 8.15 that he'd want to spend the 2 hours before bedtime with me,but no.
Scotty, isn't there any chance you could work less hours now he is here? Everything you went through to be together, surely you both need to spend some time together now, especially going through the adjustment period
 

June

Active Member
#19
Truly ,I don't know this person.he's changed so much.I understand needing male company,homesick etc,but he keeps telling me we will be OK because I will change!
And the best has yet to come! Sorry
 

Scottochott

Well-Known Member
#20
Truly ,I don't know this person.he's changed so much.I understand needing male company,homesick etc,but he keeps telling me we will be OK because I will change!
I doubt he's changed at all, you're simply seeing his true colours now he's got his visa to be here. If this is after 5 weeks, I dread to think what's coming your way.
 
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