Tunisia Travel Advice update

Essem

Moderator
Staff member
#1
Summary
Still current at:
7 March 2016
Updated:
7 March 2016
Latest update:
Summary and Terrorism section – on 2 and 7 March 2016, clashes between militants and the security forces in Ben Guerdane resulted in more than 40 deaths, including of civilians



Download map (PDF)

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) advise against all travel to:

  • the Chaambi Mountain National Park area
  • the Tunisia-Algeria border crossing points at Ghardimaou, Hazoua and Sakiet Sidi Youssef
  • the militarized zone south of, but not including, the towns of El Borma and Dhehiba
  • within 5km of the Libya border area from north of Dhehiba up to but not including the Ras Ajdir border crossing
The FCO advise against all but essential travel to the rest of Tunisia.

Following the violent confrontations between protesters and security forces in late January the curfew imposed on 22 January 2016 has been lifted.

If you choose to travel to or remain in Tunisia then you should check that your insurance policy provides adequate cover. You should be especially vigilant and follow the advice of the Tunisian security authorities.

There are no direct flights between the UK and Monastir or Enfidah airports. There are daily Tunis Air flights from Tunis Carthage airport direct to London, and indirect daily departures with European carriers. Contact your airline or travel company directly if you have an enquiry about your travel plans.

If you need consular assistance (above and beyond travel information) you should contact the British Embassy in Tunis.
 
#2
So when is a good time to visted here in Tuninia? I plan on coming the end of the month of August .
 

Aslemma

Well-Known Member
#6
No need to apologise for being from Canada. From what I hear it's a beautiful place. :)
 

sass

Active Member
#7
Are you French Canadian? I just got back on Sunday, if you go in August, be prepared for the heat, it can be very uncomfortable, especially in the capital.
 

scotty_bambam

Well-Known Member
#8
Are you French Canadian? I just got back on Sunday, if you go in August, be prepared for the heat, it can be very uncomfortable, especially in the capital.
If you can find the ladies other posts she's native nova Scotian.if that's correct.lol.
 

ROULLA

Registered User
#9
Foreign travel advice to Tunisia

Still current at: 23 March 2016
State of emergency extended to 22 of June 2016
The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) advise against all travel to:

the Chaambi Mountain National Park areathe Tunisia-Algeria border crossing points at Ghardimaou, Hazoua and Sakiet Sidi Youssefthe militarized zone south of, but not including, the towns of El Borma and Dhehibawithin 5km of the Libya border area from north of Dhehiba up to but not including the Ras Ajdir border crossing

The FCO advise against all but essential travel to the rest of Tunisia.

The curfew imposed on 22 January 2016 was lifted on 4 February following the violent confrontations between protesters and security forces in late January.

A state of emergency is in effect in Tunisia, imposed after a suicide attack on a police bus on 24 November 2015. It has been extended a number of times. On 22 March it was extended for a further 3 months, to 22 June 2016.

The threat from terrorism in Tunisia is high. Further attacks remain highly likely, including against foreigners. Security forces remain on a high state of alert in Tunis and other locations. You should be vigilant, avoid crowded places and follow the advice of the Tunisian security authorities and your travel company, if you have one. See Terrorism

Since the terrorist attack in Sousse in June 2015, we have been working closely with the Tunisian authorities to investigate the attack and the wider threat from terrorist groups in Tunisia. Although we have had good co-operation from the Tunisian government, including putting in place additional security measures, the intelligence and threat picture has developed considerably, reinforcing our view that a further terrorist attack is highly likely. On balance, we do not believe the mitigation measures in place provide adequate protection for British tourists in Tunisia at the present time.

On 8 July, the Tunisian Prime Minister stated publicly that further attacks were likely. The Tunisian authorities have increased their security measures but have also acknowledged the limitations in their ability to counter the current terrorist threat.

In early March 2016, security forces repelled attacks by terrorists in Ben Guerdane, close to the Libyan border. Over 60 fatalities resulted, the majority of which were terrorists, though members of the security forces and civilians were also killed. Ben Guerdane remains under curfew while the security forces continue operations in the area.

There are no direct flights between the UK and Monastir or Enfidah airports. There are daily Tunis Air flights from Tunis Carthage airport direct to London, and indirect daily departures with European carriers. Contact your airline or travel company directly if you have an enquiry about your travel plans.

If you need consular assistance (above and beyond travel information) you should contact the British Embassy in Tunis.

If you choose to travel to or remain in Tunisia then you should check that your insurance policy provides adequate cover.

Take out comprehensive travel and medical insurance before travelling.
 

Milk

Well-Known Member
#10
These advisories make me so sad. Part of the reason for them is to put fear into people so they won't go and of course to protect the people because someone could sue the UN if they didn't put the advisory out and an attack happened.

In 2012 when I went there was an advisory not to go and I had the best time of my life. Yes things have gotten bad since and I am fully aware of the incidents that have taken place however does it warrant a whole Country to suffer the consequences? Does it warrant many people losing jobs? Tunisia is smaller than the province I live in but it is still big enough for everyone to enjoy without panic.

My advice if you go is too be activity aware of your surroundings and don't be Canadian crazy....lol I am taking my two smaller children this summer, if all goes well. I want to open business in Sousse. If anybody has any great suggestions on how to do business in Tunisia I am all ears :)
 

Essem

Moderator
Staff member
#11
Summary
Still current at:20 November 2017Updated:20 November 2017Latest update:
Summary - the state of emergency in Tunisia was extended by a further 3 months on 12 November 2017
Download map (PDF)
The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) advise against all travel to:
  • the Chaambi Mountains National Park and the designated military operations zones of Mount Salloum, Mount Sammamma and Mount Mghila
  • the militarised zone south of the towns of El Borma and Dhehiba
  • within 20km of the rest of the Libya border area north of Dhehiba
  • the town of Ben Guerdane and immediate surrounding area
The FCO advise against all but essential travel to:
  • areas south of, and including, the towns of Nefta, Douz, Médenine, Zarzis
  • within 30km of the border with Algeria south of, and including, the town of Jendouba (this area includes the archaeological sites of Bulla Regia and Chemtou)
  • the governorate of Kasserine, including the town of Sbeitla
There’s a heightened risk of terrorism against aviation. Additional security measures which restrict electronic devices on-board planes, have been in place on flights departing from Tunisia to the UK since March. You should co-operate fully with security officials. For more information about how this may affect your flight, including if you’re transiting through Tunisia on the way to the UK, read this guidance page and contact your airline or travel company if you have further questions.
A state of emergency is in effect in Tunisia, imposed after a suicide attack on a police bus on 24 November 2015. It’s been extended a number of times, most recently on 12 November 2017 by 3 months.
Since the terrorist attack in Sousse in June 2015, which targeted tourists, the UK government has been working closely with the Tunisian authorities to investigate the attack and the wider threat from terrorist groups. The Tunisian government has improved protective security in major cities and tourist resorts.
But terrorists are still very likely to try to carry out attacks in Tunisia. Security forces remain on a high state of alert in Tunis and other places. You should be vigilant at all times, including around religious sites and festivals. Follow the advice of the Tunisian security authorities and your travel company if you have one. See Terrorism
You can contact the emergency services by calling 197 (police), 190 (ambulance) or 198 (civil protection).
If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission.
Take out comprehensive travel and medical insurance before travelling.
 

Essem

Moderator
Staff member
#12
Still current at: 7 December 2017
Updated:7 December 2017
Latest update:
Summary - there are likely to be protests and demonstrations across the Middle East and North Africa region following the US announcement on the status of Jerusalem on 6 December 2017; protests are planned on Friday 8 December in many towns in Tunisia, including in central Tunis around Avenue Habib Bourguiba; you should avoid any demonstrations and follow the instructions of the local police authorities



The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) advise against all travel to:
  • the Chaambi Mountains National Park and the designated military operations zones of Mount Salloum, Mount Sammamma and Mount Mghila
  • the militarised zone south of the towns of El Borma and Dhehiba
  • within 20km of the rest of the Libya border area north of Dhehiba
  • the town of Ben Guerdane and immediate surrounding area
The FCO advise against all but essential travel to:
  • areas south of, and including, the towns of Nefta, Douz, Médenine, Zarzis
  • within 30km of the border with Algeria south of, and including, the town of Jendouba (this area includes the archaeological sites of Bulla Regia and Chemtou)
  • the governorate of Kasserine, including the town of Sbeitla
There are likely to be protests and demonstrations across the Middle East and North Africa region following the US announcement on the status of Jerusalem on 6 December 2017. Protests are planned on Friday 8 December in many towns in Tunisia, including in central Tunis around Avenue Habib Bourguiba. You should avoid any demonstrations and follow the instructions of the local police authorities

There’s a heightened risk of terrorism against aviation. Additional security measures which restrict electronic devices on-board planes, have been in place on flights departing from Tunisia to the UK since March. You should co-operate fully with security officials. For more information about how this may affect your flight, including if you’re transiting through Tunisia on the way to the UK, read this guidance page and contact your airline or travel company if you have further questions.

A state of emergency is in effect in Tunisia, imposed after a suicide attack on a police bus on 24 November 2015. It’s been extended a number of times, most recently on 12 November 2017 by 3 months.

Since the terrorist attack in Sousse in June 2015, which targeted tourists, the UK government has been working closely with the Tunisian authorities to investigate the attack and the wider threat from terrorist groups. The Tunisian government has improved protective security in major cities and tourist resorts.

But terrorists are still very likely to try to carry out attacks in Tunisia. Security forces remain on a high state of alert in Tunis and other places. You should be vigilant at all times, including around religious sites and festivals. Follow the advice of the Tunisian security authorities and your travel company if you have one. See Terrorism

You can contact the emergency services by calling 197 (police), 190 (ambulance) or 198 (civil protection).
If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission.
Take out comprehensive travel and medical insurance before travelling.
 

Essem

Moderator
Staff member
#13
Summary
Still current at:15 January 2018
Updated:15 January 2018
Latest update:
Summary - protests in several towns and cities across Tunisia continue; you should avoid protests and follow the instructions of the local authorities
Download map (PDF)
The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) advise against all travel to:
  • the Chaambi Mountains National Park and the designated military operations zones of Mount Salloum, Mount Sammamma and Mount Mghila
  • the militarised zone south of the towns of El Borma and Dhehiba
  • within 20km of the rest of the Libya border area north of Dhehiba
  • the town of Ben Guerdane and immediate surrounding area
The FCO advise against all but essential travel to:
  • areas south of, and including, the towns of Nefta, Douz, Médenine, Zarzis
  • within 30km of the border with Algeria south of, and including, the town of Jendouba (this area includes the archaeological sites of Bulla Regia and Chemtou)
  • the governorate of Kasserine, including the town of Sbeitla
Protests in several towns and cities across Tunisia continue. You should avoid protests and follow the instructions of the local authorities.
There’s a heightened risk of terrorism against aviation. Additional security measures which restrict electronic devices on-board planes, have been in place on flights departing from Tunisia to the UK since March. You should co-operate fully with security officials. For more information about how this may affect your flight, including if you’re transiting through Tunisia on the way to the UK, read this guidance page and contact your airline or travel company if you have further questions.
A state of emergency is in effect in Tunisia, imposed after a suicide attack on a police bus on 24 November 2015. It’s been extended a number of times, most recently on 12 November 2017 by 3 months.
Since the terrorist attack in Sousse in June 2015, which targeted tourists, the UK government has been working closely with the Tunisian authorities to investigate the attack and the wider threat from terrorist groups. The Tunisian government has improved protective security in major cities and tourist resorts.
But terrorists are still very likely to try to carry out attacks in Tunisia. Security forces remain on a high state of alert in Tunis and other places. You should be vigilant at all times, including around religious sites and festivals. Follow the advice of the Tunisian security authorities and your travel company if you have one. See Terrorism
You can contact the emergency services by calling 197 (police), 190 (ambulance) or 198 (civil protection).
If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission.
Take out comprehensive travel and medical insurance before travelling.


https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/tunisia
 

Essem

Moderator
Staff member
#14
https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-a...ign=govuk-notifications&utm_content=immediate

Summary
Still current at:14 June 2018Updated:14 June 2018Latest update:
Summary – changes to some areas in southern and western Tunisia where the FCO advise against all but essential travel; the FCO no longer advise against all but essential travel to the town of Jendouba, and some areas of southern Tunisia, including the towns of Médenine, Tataouine and Douz; however, the FCO now advise against all but essential travel to the Biq region (west of Ghardimaou) in Jendouba governorate; Terrorism section and summary – addition of advice about the risks of travelling in more remote parts of the country
Download map (PDF)
The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) advise against all travel to:
  • the Chaambi Mountains National Park and the designated military operations zones of Mount Salloum, Mount Sammamma and Mount Mghila
  • the militarised zone south of the towns of El Borma and Dhehiba
  • within 20km of the rest of the Libya border area north of Dhehiba
  • the town of Ben Guerdane and immediate surrounding area
The FCO advise against all but essential travel to:
  • all other areas within 75km of the Libyan border, including Remada, El Borma and the town of Zarzis
  • the governorate of Kasserine, including the town of Sbeitla
  • within 10km of the border with Algeria south of Kasserine governorate, and within 30km of the border in El Kef and Jendouba governorates, including the archaeological site of Chemtou and the Biq region west of Ghardimaou
A state of emergency is in effect in Tunisia, imposed after a suicide attack on a police bus on 24 November 2015. It’s been extended a number of times, most recently on 12 March 2018 by 7 months.
Since the terrorist attack in Sousse in June 2015, which targeted tourists, the UK government has been working closely with the Tunisian authorities to investigate the attack and the wider threat from terrorist groups. The Tunisian government has improved protective security in major cities and tourist resorts.
But terrorists are still very likely to try to carry out attacks in Tunisia, including against UK and Western interests. Security forces remain on a high state of alert in Tunis and other places. You should be vigilant at all times, including around religious sites and festivals. In more remote areas of the country, including tourist sites in southern Tunisia, security forces’ response times to an incident may vary. Follow the advice of the Tunisian security authorities and your travel company if you have one. See Terrorism
There were widespread protests in January 2018 driven by economic tensions. Demonstrations often occur in Tunisia, though the majority are peaceful. However, some have affected key services, disrupted traffic or included violence.
You can contact the emergency services by calling 197 (police - when in cities and towns), 193 (national guard - when in rural areas or small villages), 190 (ambulance) or 198 (civil protection - for assistance at incidents, such as car accidents, to provide medical assistance and response to fire).
If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission.
Take out comprehensive travel and medical insurance before travelling.
 
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