Visa Knowledge and Experience

Scottochott

Well-Known Member
#61
And I hope they toughen it up more!
 

lovesarrow

Well-Known Member
#62
And I hope they toughen it up more!
Not the most helpful of comments!! :sour:

Since this is our only option, other than me moving to Tunisia which everyone here agrees is too soon, the Surinder Singh route is the only way I can be with my fiance.

Does anyone know how hard it is to get a Tunisian to France? I assume that there's the spousal visa route, but is there any other way that a Tunisian could get there? He has family in Marseille.
 

Scottochott

Well-Known Member
#63
Not the most helpful of comments!! :sour:

Since this is our only option, other than me moving to Tunisia which everyone here agrees is too soon, the Surinder Singh route is the only way I can be with my fiance.

Does anyone know how hard it is to get a Tunisian to France? I assume that there's the spousal visa route, but is there any other way that a Tunisian could get there? He has family in Marseille.
I know it was not "helpful", that is because I disagree with the principal, why should there be an easy way to get around the rules?
 

lovesarrow

Well-Known Member
#64
I know it was not "helpful", that is because I disagree with the principal, why should there be an easy way to get around the rules?
Well, as well as being unhelpful, it was also insensitive and somewhat antagonistic. You may feel that the current British immigration laws are "right", but the rest of the EU does not. It is not a way to "get around the rules" as you say, rather it is a way to use membership of the EU to achieve a goal that many would see as a basic human right.

It is not an easy route either. It will involve uprooting from the UK and moving to France for at least three months and possibly more.

I earn a wage - I am a freelancer - and my OH will also work. If you want to get upset about something, what about the fact that while I am in France my taxes will go to the frogs? Quite frankly if my family weren't based in the UK I would rather move to France and not come back, given current attitudes.
 

Scottochott

Well-Known Member
#65
I expressed a personal opinion, which is echoed by many in the uk as well as the rest of Europe, as evidenced in the recent elections. It was not an attack on you or your basic human right! You are free to move to Tunisia to be with your husband as is anyone, however I do not accept that it is a matter of basic human rights to allow anyone into the uk if they do not reach the qualifying criteria. I accept it may feel a raw deal from your perspective and you have my sympathy but that does not change the fact that the rules are there for a reason and rightly so.

As far as French taxes being paid to the "frogs", what else would you expect? Do you think any foreign workers in the uk should not pay taxes to the uk government? Or are you suggesting that they go to the workers' country of origin? Each country uses taxes to provide local services and support for those living in the country, anything else would be ridiculous. Are you aware the recent French elections resulted in the National Front gaining the largest share of the vote? I think you may be even more disappointed by the attitudes to immigration there.
 

lovesarrow

Well-Known Member
#66
These are qualifying criteria set in July 2012. Until less than 2 years ago we both would have qualified. What has changed in those two years to mean that we are no longer welcome in the UK?

Yes, you were expressing a personal opinion, but doing so in a thread regarding advice and experience with visas. That in itself is inflammatory and arguably this is not the place to voice those sorts of opinions. Had the thread been titled "views and opinions on UK immigration law" then we would be in a different situation! :rolleyes:

Since we are discussing the Surinder Singh route, I feel it is an important clarification to make that it is not a loophole in the law. This route is the result of a disparity between what the EU and the UK think is reasonable regarding immigration. The UK may not like it, but it is legal.
 

daffodil

Well-Known Member
#67
Hi Lovesarrow..

There is alot for you to think about if you embark on this route too ...

Whilst it is true that the rule is three month and one day to live in Europe..it is not looked upon favourably.....the authorities will try to plug this route as it earns no revenue for this government...

Freance as has been stated are not wanting anymore immigration, they are more hostile than the UK and the red tape in France in notoriously bad ....this is where the three months will not be enough, i doubt the authorities in France will even do the taxation and registration before three months..You will need this to prove you have actually worked whilst out of the UK..

You also have to look at the earnings required in each country as it does vary...although it is usually an easily achievable figure, you have to consider many things...inc healthcare ,etc..
 

Jane BM

Well-Known Member
#68
These are qualifying criteria set in July 2012. Until less than 2 years ago we both would have qualified. What has changed in those two years to mean that we are no longer welcome in the UK?

Yes, you were expressing a personal opinion, but doing so in a thread regarding advice and experience with visas. That in itself is inflammatory and arguably this is not the place to voice those sorts of opinions. Had the thread been titled "views and opinions on UK immigration law" then we would be in a different situation! :rolleyes:

Since we are discussing the Surinder Singh route, I feel it is an important clarification to make that it is not a loophole in the law. This route is the result of a disparity between what the EU and the UK think is reasonable regarding immigration. The UK may not like it, but it is legal.
Have to say Lovesarrow, when you post on an open forum then you will get diverse opinions. It's part and parcel, people aren't going to agree and sometimes you just have to accept that people won't see it the same way you do.

I don't object to people using a system that's in place, I blame the system itself. I also object to being prejudiced against because I DO earn over £18,600. I object to people coming here through the EU route or alternatively EU members coming here and their non EU spouses NOT having to take the required English test, not having a stamp on their visa saying 'no recourse to public funds', not having to find the money to pay for visa fees and then ILR fees...where's the equality in that? All because I happen to earn over the threshold.

I find it quite ludicrous that we are governed by 2 sets of laws which are conflicting. I do agree that I think the earnings threshold introduced was wrong, it should be based on disposable income...that's seems fair to me. Perhaps if they'd not tried to change something which was effective for something that wasn't as effective there wouldn't be so many people now looking into the SS route. However, judging by how irate people are becoming more and more lately regarding all forms of immigration and our participation in the EU I personally think this particular route won't be around or available forever!
 

Jane BM

Well-Known Member
#69
Hi Lovesarrow..

There is alot for you to think about if you embark on this route too ...

Whilst it is true that the rule is three month and one day to live in Europe..it is not looked upon favourably.....the authorities will try to plug this route as it earns no revenue for this government...

Freance as has been stated are not wanting anymore immigration, they are more hostile than the UK and the red tape in France in notoriously bad ....this is where the three months will not be enough, i doubt the authorities in France will even do the taxation and registration before three months..You will need this to prove you have actually worked whilst out of the UK..

You also have to look at the earnings required in each country as it does vary...although it is usually an easily achievable figure, you have to consider many things...inc healthcare ,etc..
Most people are having to stay in another country in the EU for longer than 3months and a day. The 3 months and a day is how long they have to work there, not live there. So invariably most people don't have a job to start with, so have to find work as well....as well as somewhere to live.
 

lovesarrow

Well-Known Member
#70
Daffodil - thank you for the information. I was not aware that there were minimum income requirements beyond being self sufficient. Thanks :)

Scottochott - you seem to have added an extra paragraph into your post after I responded, so I have only just seen it. Of course I expect to pay taxes to the French while I am there! You misunderstood the point I was making. You seem so nationalist in your views that I was suggesting you might have a problem with the French getting a UK taxpayers money. Myself, I am fine with it.

As far as racism and anti-immigration goes - meh - the UK, France - both places are full of bigots. Fortunately the French still have immigration requirements that we can achieve. We're not looking for paradise - we're looking for a way that we can live together and eventually come to the UK to be close to my family.
 

daffodil

Well-Known Member
#71
It is totally unrealistic to think you can just go from the UK for 3 months (thats what i said).....Most people who opt for this route are out of the country for one or two yrs......The three month rule is irrelevant because it is not practiable..

Lets not forget either it is very difficult to find work in a country like France...even in Malta where there is not a language barrier it is not easy to find work as if the work can be done by a native they are obliged to give it to them (as in Tunisia).......So nothing about this route is easy...
 

lovesarrow

Well-Known Member
#72
Jane - you're right, I don't think that route will be around for much longer which is why I think we need to do it now. I have spent two years now looking for a job where I will earn over the threshold and I haven't been able to find one, so this is the only way forward that I can see. Whether we have to stay for 3 months or more doesn't really bother me, as long as the route stays open long enough for us to do it.

As for diverse opinions - clearly not everyone will agree. What p*sses me off is that in a thread about advice, that opinions are coming into it and sending the discussion off course. Maybe it is too much to ask that people stick to giving advice in this thread? But clearly the two people who have asked for help in this thread are two people looking for help getting them or their OH to the UK. Opinions shouldn't really come into it.
 

daffodil

Well-Known Member
#73
Hi Lovesarrow....

Most countries do have a criteria for the amount you need to live on yes..but it is fairly low....

Malta is 135 euro a week and i think France is something like 150 euro plus mandatory health plan in place....The countries are not wanting to pay out benefits...France is not as soft as UK...

As you will be aware many Tunisians are in France...many of them live in areas together in quite appalling conditions as they often have to undertake low paid work ...Of course this is not going to affect you as you are self employed, it is the red tape you will have to deal with...
 

lovesarrow

Well-Known Member
#74
It is totally unrealistic to think you can just go from the UK for 3 months (thats what i said).....Most people who opt for this route are out of the country for one or two yrs......The three month rule is irrelevant because it is not practiable..

Lets not forget either it is very difficult to find work in a country like France...even in Malta where there is not a language barrier it is not easy to find work as if the work can be done by a native they are obliged to give it to them (as in Tunisia).......So nothing about this route is easy...
I'm freelance and work online, so I can work anywhere. I am not aware of any requirement that I be employed by a French employer while I am over there. Is there one? We both speak French so I'm not concerned about a language barrier. I am concerned about the requirement that a French person be preferred for a role over a Tunisian, but what can we do except try? He has qualifications.
 

lovesarrow

Well-Known Member
#75
Daffodil - our posts crossed! I am self-employed so not concerned about me finding a job. It's good to know what the lower income limit is for France and the healthcare stuff, thanks :)

His uncle lives in Marseille. I would imagine it is much the same as it is in the UK - that immigrants tend to live together and support each other and that they take whatever work they can find. I'm hoping that with both of our incomes combined we can find somewhere decent to live.
 

daffodil

Well-Known Member
#76
Hi Lovearrow

I think you misunderstood me ...No you DONT have to be employed by a French company as you are self employed.....I know nothing about working online BUT i suppose for your business to be considered legitimate and not a hobby you pay tax etc?

Well as your business is online im not sure how or what you would have to do to prove you were in France doing this..I have no knowledge of the procedure involved..but you would prove accomodation and utilites etc and health care etc so should be ok i guess and you would have books to back up your income...

If your husband has qualifications and he is obviously fluent in French work should be ok for him too.....but remember unemployment is high in France and they are suffering right now..tensions are high against immigration...France has an affinity with Tunisia too because of history, so that all helps..

The only other problem is what if they close the door before you have been there and settled and met all the requirements? You will must be prepared to be out of the UK for a while..if you can do that then like you say what can you do but try?
 

Kris

Administrator
Staff member
#77
The EU route is very difficult imagine you do all of it and then the rules change whilst you are out of the country? Or you make a mistake.
 

daffodil

Well-Known Member
#78
I'm freelance and work online, so I can work anywhere. I am not aware of any requirement that I be employed by a French employer while I am over there. Is there one? We both speak French so I'm not concerned about a language barrier. I am concerned about the requirement that a French person be preferred for a role over a Tunisian, but what can we do except try? He has qualifications.
Daffodil - our posts crossed! I am self-employed so not concerned about me finding a job. It's good to know what the lower income limit is for France and the healthcare stuff, thanks :)

His uncle lives in Marseille. I would imagine it is much the same as it is in the UK - that immigrants tend to live together and support each other and that they take whatever work they can find. I'm hoping that with both of our incomes combined we can find somewhere decent to live.
Marseille was the area i was thinking of......Apparently this is where many Tunisians have gathered and they live exactly as they would at home in Tunisia...
 

lovesarrow

Well-Known Member
#79
Daffodil - I am registered self-employed in the UK and pay all relevant taxes. I think as a freelancer I need to speak with a French attorney and register somehow.

I imagine that as long as I register and can prove that I have been resident in France and earned money during that period and can show them my books I should be OK.

My main concern is that they close the door before we get through. It's not the end of the world, but it would mean rethinking our plans. It might mean that we live in France longer than we would like - even years - and that I find any job I can in the UK in order to meet the income requirements for going the UK visa route if we still want to be close to my family.

Funnily enough, living in France for an extended period wouldn't bother me. The main issue would be missing my niece and nephew grow up over here.
 

lovesarrow

Well-Known Member
#80
Marseille was the area i was thinking of......Apparently this is where many Tunisians have gathered and they live exactly as they would at home in Tunisia...
Just like Southall then! :p The street signs in Southall are bilingual these days. I think it is human nature. Every country has an immigrant community that has created their own home away from home. (For better or worse...)
 
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