Adopting a Little Tunisian

ss0117

New Member
#21
Thank you for all the replies.
I will contact Mr Imed of SOS children but I know that SOS village does not advocate adoption. Is that the only orphanage there ?
I have also emailed the embassy.
We do intend to bring the child back with us and raise as a family.

Missmetal, it definitely is a very frustrating, emotional process and a lot of hassle, specially when one is trying to do independent international adoption but we have just started and I am not losing hope.
 

Essem

Moderator
Staff member
#22
Thank you for all the replies.
I will contact Mr Imed of SOS children but I know that SOS village does not advocate adoption. Is that the only orphanage there ?
I have also emailed the embassy.
We do intend to bring the child back with us and raise as a family.

Missmetal, it definitely is a very frustrating, emotional process and a lot of hassle, specially when one is trying to do independent international adoption but we have just started and I am not losing hope.

SOS is not the only orphanage, there are others - I think Roulla may know of one in or near Nabeul but I haven't visited it myself. I'll check out if there are any more in this area and let you know.

I really hope someone is able to help you with your dream of adopting a child. When I visit SOS, I want to take all of the children home with me. They are so very well looked after there and have everything they need. Keep us up to date with any information that you find out as adopting in Tunisia has been a bit of a grey area for us on here so far.
 

ss0117

New Member
#23
^Thanks and yes, I hope so too.

I did send a message to SOS village Akouda and got a reply back that I need to contact National Institute of Children protection and that it is the only organization allowed to do adoptions in Tunisia.
My problem is the language barrier. They speak french or arabic. I know someone who speaks arabic and will find out if and when she can help me with calling the institute and get more information.
I am also waiting to hear back from the embassy, hopefully I will be able to communicate with them easily without any language issue.
 

ROULLA

Registered User
#24
^Thanks and yes, I hope so too.

I did send a message to SOS village Akouda and got a reply back that I need to contact National Institute of Children protection and that it is the only organization allowed to do adoptions in Tunisia.
My problem is the language barrier. They speak french or arabic. I know someone who speaks arabic and will find out if and when she can help me with calling the institute and get more information.
I am also waiting to hear back from the embassy, hopefully I will be able to communicate with them easily without any language issue.
Is your husband Tunisian? The reason that I ask is that I am more than sure that the law in Tunisia on adopting is on the basis that you or your partner are Tunisian, I can understand this because even here in the UK when people foster or adopt they have to take into account the child's background meaning language and culture as these are very important for the child.

I know that I may sound a little negative when I write the above but you can understand where I am coming from, can't you ?, but it is so important even though these children need to be re homed, its very different in Tunisia and even though there are many children in homes their biological parents are allowed to visit them and some do.

I remember this year I saw a women breast feeding her child in one of the homes because no one knew that she had a child out of wedlock, I felt very sorry for this young lady , it must be heartbreaking for her knowing that she is leading 2 lives really.

Have you tried to adopt a child in the USA as you say that is where you are living now ?
 

ss0117

New Member
#25
Hi Roulla,
Neither I or my husband is Tunisian.
Your comment does not sound negative. If Tunisia has the requirement for citizenship or residency, I understand. Many of the other countries do too (only that I disagree with it :)
I would rather a child gets a loving home, family , parental love than stay within the same culture, region etc. We can always keep visiting and learn the language.
Anyways that is a separate debate, infact there are many debates within the whole adoption.

As you said the social workers try to keep the child within the same culture or in our case religion. I did investigate and searched and talked to couple of foster homes and agencies locally but I doubt the social workers would let a non muslim child to be adopted by a muslim couple and finding a child suitable for adoption may take very very long. That is the feeling I got after talking around here.

So we decided to look internationally. I know Morocco allowed non residents and citizens to adopt before it closed foreign adoption. Pakistan also does but requires a longer stay within the country after adoption. Many of the other countries require the parents to be either residing there or citizen.

There is a US state website that has adoption requirements for all the countries and that is where I found out about all those other countries but it does not state anything about Tunisia so I am still hopeful.
I am going to wait to hear from the official sources if we are not eligible to adopt and then go on from there.

Thanks
 

ss0117

New Member
#26
Also we do not want to break a family or take a child away from his/her living mother or father.
Probably a child that has lost both parents or has been abandoned with no hope of ever being united with birth family and has been put up for adoption.
 

ss0117

New Member
#27
I thought I will update the thread in case someone also looking for the same information I was.
According to Tunisia Laws, one of the parent has to be Tunisian to be eligible to adopt from Tunisia (sad for us)
The judge may over rule this requirement in certain cases, for instance if the couple lives in Tunisia even if they are not Tunisian, or has some ties to Tunisia. The couple still has to be muslim though.

Institut National de Protection de l'Enfance de Tunisie is the main and only organization that handles all the adoptions there so anyone looking to adopt must contact them.
 

Essem

Moderator
Staff member
#28
Thanks ssO117 really useful information. Let us know how you get on with your adoption plans.

All best wishes.
 

lynn

Well-Known Member
#29
Good Luck in your adoption, lets face it, there are a lot of children all over the world needing a loving home. What about Syria?
 

Scottochott

Well-Known Member
#30
There are plenty of children in everyone's home country who are looking for adoption, surely that is much better for the child. At some point the children concerned must be told, I'm not sure taking them abroad even to a supposedly better future is healthy. This should always be about the children, not the wishes of the adoptive parents.
 

Jane BM

Well-Known Member
#31
Adoption in England (don't know about the rest of the UK) is incredibly difficult. I know so many couples who have been refused for either being too old...40!!! :rolleyes:, mixed faith marriage or not financially solvent. Absolutely ridiculous...

While that continues then sadly we will continue to have far too many children shunted from foster home to foster home,never knowing stability, or the feeling of being loved unconditionally. Surely they're the most important factors.

I can understand why people do go to other countries to adopt!!
 

Scottochott

Well-Known Member
#32
The rules are stringent, but are currently under review, it is right that the checks are there but yes are perhaps currently too onerous, however they vary from county to county in the uk. Everyone wants a new baby, and the older children suffer. Age, religion and financial status are important, but if potential adoptive parents are flexible then it can work, but no doubt some authorities could be more flexible too.

I reiterate that this should be about the child's interest, and what happens when they are an adult should be taken into account. I don't know many adoptive parents but I know many adopted children, myself being one. There is no doubt that the children concerned do have many questions and concerns on reaching adulthood, if not before. Being told that you were taken from another country/race /religion can have an enormous effect on one's psyche, and is not to be underestimated.

My heart goes out to people who want children but for whatever reason cannot, however their desires are subordinate to the interests of the child. I could give many examples of successful adoptions, yet also many which have turned sour, one in particular of a close friend who was born in Brasil, adopted by Jewish parents who live in Norway yet tell him his family are Israeli, the poor guy is really screwed up, even more so after recently visiting Brasil.

These situations are never clean cut, and there will always be exceptions, however I think broadly adoptive parents and children should have a similar background. I don't think the Madonnas and Angelina Jolies of this world set a good example.
 
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ROULLA

Registered User
#33
Hi Everyone hope that you are all well!

I have a cousin who was unable to conceive and even tried IVF 3 times and she too tried to adopt without any luck, she is a good person, has her own company and the child would not go without as she has everything but they still said no, so sad as she has so much love to give any poor child.
Sad that so many children are bought up in homes when there are so many people out there who want to adopt.
 

Daria

New Member
#34
He everyone. I m new on this website. Could smb tell me more about tunisian adoption? My husband is tunisian and we will live in Tunisia, nchaallah. We have 2 kids, but think about adoprion more. We was gone to adopt in Rossia, but now so mane new roules.
 

ROULLA

Registered User
#35
He everyone. I m new on this website. Could smb tell me more about tunisian adoption? My husband is tunisian and we will live in Tunisia, nchaallah. We have 2 kids, but think about adoprion more. We was gone to adopt in Rossia, but now so mane new roules.
Hi Daria and welcome to the forum!

Where about's in Tunisia are you going to live ? There are quite a few SOS children's homes in Tunisia and as your husband is Tunisian and can speak Arabic then he can go and inquire.

Here is the website for the SOS children's homes, bearing in mind that there are more but are hidden if you know what I mean.

http://www.sos-villages.org.tn/index.asp?pId=2 There is an SOS in Tunis, Siliana, Sousse, Sfax

If you contact the above then someone will be able to help you, good luck.

There is a children's home that I know of that is in Nabeul, if you are interested then let me know and I will get all the infomation that I have from my bits and bobs tucked away somewhere.

I also thought that you may like to read this article.

Tunisia: Adopted Children Enjoy Ample Legal Protection

Adoption Laws in Tunisia are clearcut in their protection of the child adoptee.
In 1957, Tunisia passed a landmark law on fostering and adoption. "The articles of Law No. 27 imposed strict rules and criteria for adopters so as to guarantee the best living conditions for the adoptee," stated Karim Hmaichi, a deputy director of research at the The National Institute of Children Protection.

Adoption in Tunisia requires many conditions on the part of the adopter, who should be "a rational male or female, married, ethical, healthy in mind and body, and able to look after the affairs of the adoptee. The age difference between the adoptee and the adopter must be at least 15 years," states Chapter 10 of the adoption law.

The law emphasizes the necessity of treating the adoptee as if they were the actual son or daughter of the adopter. Chapter 6 states that the adoptee has all the civil rights resulting from lineage, including the adopter's last name and inheritance.

According to Chapter 11 of the law, "a Tunisian can adopt a foreigner," but it is not possible for foreigners to adopt Tunisians. In the past, foreigners were allowed to adopt Tunisian children, but in 1996 this was abolished for fear that adoption by foreigners would change the child's identity. That year, Tunisia signed onto the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Child (UNCRC) in which Article 8 requires that "state parties respect the right of the child to preserve his or her identity, including nationality, name, and family relations as recognized by law."

The adoption process contains many procedures for the adopter, who must first complete a test in order to clarify the socio-economic situation of their family. The judge issues his adoption ruling once he reviews the background of the adopter. The adoptee would eventually receive a formal document from the court, stating his real name and the name of his real father and mother.

If a child rejects the custody of the adopter mother to whom the court ruled in favor, the court ruling is cancelled to conform to the wish of the child out of consideration of their best interest. This procedure is in keeping with Chapter 67 of the Personal Status Code and Chapter 4 of the Child Protection Code.

Hmaichi confirmed that adoption is showing practical success in Tunisia since it conserves the dignity of the adoptee as the real son of the adopter. However, from an Islamic point of view, adoption is not allowed. The main reason for this is that it is not always possible to know the real family name of the adoptee, which could lead the unsuspecting man or woman to marry a sibling. The Mufti of Tunisia considers adoption as religiously forbidden. "It is a tradition of Aljahiliyyah (the era that preceded Islam)," he said, adding that the Prophet Mohammed adopted a child before the advent of Islam but once Islam emerged he then considered his adoptee as a foster child.

The National Institute of Children Protection receives 800 adoption applications each year, according to Neema Boulaarass, who is the head of the Institute. However, of those applicants, 30% are successful in receiving a new son or daughter, meaning that only 240 children are adopted each year.

The Institute receives an average of 480 children each year, but Boulaarass pointed out that there are now fewer children up for adoption, because many biological parents are reclaiming them after they have been convinced to marry each other. The percentage of reclaimed children out of all those given up for adoption exceeded 40% last year. "The process of identifying children's parents has been improved in the last few years, and it's thanks to DNA testing," stated Boulaarass.

After adoption, the National Institute of Children Protection pledges to monitor the adoptee in his new family for a period of three months. "There is a special team that makes sudden visits to the house of family and the Institute's agents maintain surveillance. Once a threat is detected, we interfere to examine the environment of the adoptee and sometimes we have to abolish the adoption contract," Hmaichi stated.
 

Daria

New Member
#36
Thanks Roulla!:) We will live in Sousse or Monastir i think.
This is really good article. Is it possible in Tunisia adopt child and keep his real family name? We r muslim and for my husband it's so important.In my country we can do it, but we need stay there almost 6 monthes, what is not good idea, since we live in China right now.
If i undesrstand right, in Tunisia just SOS villages? Do they have just kids home?
 
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gem15

Well-Known Member
#37
A friend of ours is Austrian and she is married to a Tunisian and they adopted a little girl in Tunis, this little girl has their last name and Austrian nationality too.

She said the process isnt easy but its like this in every country.
 

Daria

New Member
#38
Maybe it was hard cus they make adoption also in Austria. We will not give russian nationality, cus will not live in Russia
 

gem15

Well-Known Member
#39
Maybe it was hard cus they make adoption also in Austria. We will not give russian nationality, cus will not live in Russia
They also live in Tunisia and have done for 15 years but im pretty sure if a british citizen adopted a non british child they would still get the citizenship.
 

rabah

Well-Known Member
#40
Thanks Roulla!:) We will live in Sousse or Monastir i think.
This is really good article. Is it possible in Tunisia adopt child and keep his real family name? We r muslim and for my husband it's so important.In my country we can do it, but we need stay there almost 6 monthes, what is not good idea, since we live in China right now.
If i undesrstand right, in Tunisia just SOS villages? Do they have just kids home?
 
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