Chit Chat about anything..

ROULLA

Registered User
Another point to bear in mind is that if Cameron loses he will possibly step down (not a bad thing) but Boris will be in a stronger position to step into his shoes (an absolute disaster). My worst nightmare is Boris as our prime minister and Trump in charge in America - a buffoon and a dangerous lunatic!
Morning Aslemma, Hope that your sciatica has eased a bit. I know Boris is quite eccentric to say the least but would it be a complete disaster if he lead the way? As for Trump's, he is a complete different kettle of fish, he's arrogant, racist and seems to think that the world revolves around him. I personally can't stand him, however, I do like Hilary. Thatcher would have lead the way, she was the iron lady.
It's really hard because more countries have applied to be within the EU, Albania, Macedonia, Turkey, Montenegro and Serbia,,,bringing the total amount to 33 countries. Will we have fair access to public services? I somehow don't think so. Plus the amount of money being spent every week is phenomenal. £350 million, I think that with a rebate they pay 276 million, somewhere along those figures anyway.. I think that everyone has to weigh the options out and think things through carefully. .
 
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ROULLA

Registered User
hi roulla hope you and your family are well. to be honest i dont really know what to vote :( x
Morning Annibee, How are you? We are all fine thank you.
There are a few documentaries that you could watch, these will help have a better understanding on what's, what.
Britain pays 350 million per week to stay in the EU, that's a phenomenal amount of money. . According to Johnson they actually get half of this back but have no say on how it's spent... I don't like the fact that EU law overrules UK law. This stops the British public from being able to vote out the politicians who make our laws. There are so many things to consider. :) X
 

Jane BM

Well-Known Member
Another point to bear in mind is that if Cameron loses he will possibly step down (not a bad thing) but Boris will be in a stronger position to step into his shoes (an absolute disaster). My worst nightmare is Boris as our prime minister and Trump in charge in America - a buffoon and a dangerous lunatic!
I'm still praying it's neither Trump or Clinton, both egomaniacs, liars and neither to be trusted. Still hoping somehow Bernie can be the democrat candidate and if it wasn't for their electoral system there'd still be a good chance he could be! X
 

Aslemma

Well-Known Member
I do agree there's a lot to consider on both sides and we each have to make our own minds up. The main thing to bear in mind is that we will have to live with the result for many years to come as it is doubtful there will be another referendum.
 

ROULLA

Registered User
I do agree there's a lot to consider on both sides and we each have to make our own minds up. The main thing to bear in mind is that we will have to live with the result for many years to come as it is doubtful there will be another referendum.
Morning Aslemma, How are you?
Only 9 days to go before we know what is going to happen. As for Hillary or eccentric Trump we won't know til November, I think it is.
 

Aslemma

Well-Known Member
Morning Roulla. I'm a little better this morning but just when it starts easing it comes back with a vengeance.

I think the referendum is too close to call and it will all depend on how many of either persuasion turn out to vote. Regarding Trump, I've got nothing against eccentrics and think they add a little gaiety to the world, but please don't let them be in charge of a country, especially one as important as America.

The dreadfull shooting ra few days ago has added fuel to the fire and he hasn't hesitated to use it to his advantage. It is no good saying on here that terrorism is against the teachings of Islam as we all know this. People who are prejudiced and have preconceived ideas will be almost impossible to see anything but their own point of view. Look at how these people want to hang on to their guns, despite all evidence that without them there would inevitably be less mass shootings.
 
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ROULLA

Registered User
Morning Roulla. I'm a little better this morning but just when it starts easing it comes back with a vengeance.

I think the referendum is too close to call and it will all depend on how many of either persuasion turn out to vote. Regarding Trump, I've got nothing against eccentrics and think they add a little gaiety to the world, but please don't let them be in charge of a country, especially one as important as America.

The dreadfull shooting ra few days ago has added fuel to the fire and he hasn't hesitated to use it to his advantage. It is no good saying on here that terrorism is against the teachings of Islam as we all know this. People who are prejudiced and have preconceived ideas will be almost impossible to see anything but their own point of view. Look at how these people want to hang on to their guns, despite all evidence that without them there would inevitably be less mass shootings.
Hi Aslemma, glad the pain has eased a bit. I've just sat in the front room watching my son administrator his injection. Anyway, as far as Trump is concerned he hasn't got a clue on how to do himself any favours.. I also don't mind eccentric people, even Boris is eccentric. The shooting in America has become some sort of fashion. It's terrible what has happened. I do like Obama though.
Speak to you later :)
 

Aslemma

Well-Known Member
I agree with you about Obama Roulla. Although he's not actually a politician, the only one over here that I trust is Sadiq Khan, and that's despite not being a labour voter.
 

ROULLA

Registered User
I agree with you about Obama Roulla. Although he's not actually a politician, the only one over here that I trust is Sadiq Khan, and that's despite not being a labour voter.
Yes Aslemma, Sadiq seems very humble and down to earth...so glad he didn't become a dentist like he wanted to. I say good luck to him for the future.
 

ROULLA

Registered User
This is such a sad story, but at the same time heart warming as there are some amazing and kind people out there.

Funerals are beginning for the victims of this week’s tragic mass terrorist shooting in Orlando, and family members from across the country have begun their sad journeys to say goodbye. In the midst of their great grief, the support of their communities and even strangers are bringing much comfort to thesebereft relatives of lost loved ones. Perhaps the most shining example thus far, one that truly restored faith in humanity, is the treatment of victim Luis Omar Ocasio-Capo’s grandmother on her JetBlue flight to Orlando. JetBlue employee Kelly Davis Karas detailed the extraordinary event in a Facebook post, saying:

“Today my dear friend Melinda and I had the sad privilege of attending to his grandmother on our flight as she made her journey to Orlando to join her family during this unspeakable time.

Knowing she was making this hard journey alone, JetBlue employees made sure to be at her side every step of the way. Melinda stood quietly by her wheelchair while we waited until it was time to board. Kellie, the gate agent, boarded with her and helped get her settled. Melinda and I gave her a blanket, a pillow, a box of tissues and water so she could be as comfortable as possible. She was understandably distraught, but met us with kindness and gentleness. And gratitude.

But here’s where our flight got truly inspiring. I had the idea to pass around a piece of paper to everyone on board and invite them to sign it for this grieving grandmother. I talked it over with Melinda and she started the process from the back of the plane. As we took beverage orders, we whispered a heads up about the plan as we went.

Halfway through, Melinda called me, “Kel, I think you should start another paper from the front. Folks are writing PARAGRAPHS.” So I did. Then we started one in the middle. Lastly, running out of time on our hour and fifteen minute flight, we handed out pieces of paper to everyone still waiting.

When we gathered them together to present them to her, we didn’t have just a sheet of paper covered in names, which is what I had envisioned. Instead, we had page after page after page after page of long messages offering condolences, peace, love and support. There were even a couple of cash donations, and more than a few tears.

When we landed, I made an announcement that the company had emailed to us earlier in the morning to use as an optional addition to our normal landing announcement, which states “JetBlue stands with Orlando.” Then with her permission and at the request of a couple of passengers, we offered a moment of silence in Omar’s memory.

As we deplaned, EVERY SINGLE PERSON STOPPED TO OFFER HER THEIR CONDOLENCES. Some just said they were sorry, some touched her hand, some hugged her, some cried with her. But every single person stopped to speak to her, and not a single person was impatient at the slower deplaning process.

I am moved to tears yet again as I struggle to put our experience into words. In spite of a few hateful, broken human beings in this world who can all too easily legally get their hands on mass assault weapons – people ARE kind. People DO care. And through our customers’ humanity today, and through the generosity of this wonderful company I am so grateful to work for, I am hopeful that someday soon we can rally together to make the world a safer place for all.
 

ROULLA

Registered User
Hope that you all have a wonderful and relaxing day :) X X
 

ROULLA

Registered User
Reality Check: 'Do I need a new passport?' and other Brexit questions
  • 24 June 2016
  • Image copyrightGETTY IMAGES
The Reality Check team has been sent many questions about people's personal circumstances and how they will be affected by the UK leaving the European Union.

David Cameron has said he plans to let his successor activate Article 50, which is the point when the clock starts on the negotiations for a Brexit.

Once an application has been made, it has to be completed within two years. That period can be extended but only if all 28 EU countries agree.

You can read more about the effect on your finances here. And here are some of the other things we've been asked about the most.

Will I need a new passport?

You will have noticed that the top line on the front of the UK passport says "European Union".

Because the UK will remain a member of the EU for as long as it takes to negotiate the exit deal, such passports will be valid over that period - so there is no need to worry if you are travelling this summer, for example.

After the UK leaves, there will presumably be new British passports that will no longer say "European Union" on them.

While we can't say this for sure, it seems likely that the new design would just be phased in as existing passports expire.

Image copyrightTHINKSTOCK
Will my Ehic card still work?

The European Health Insurance Card (Ehic) entitles travellers to state-provided emergency medical treatment within the EU country they are visiting.

It works in any EU country as well as Switzerland and the European Economic Area (EEA) countries Norway, Liechtenstein and Iceland.

It will continue to work for as long as the UK is in the EU - so for at least as long as Article 50 negotiations take.

After that, it is possible that the UK will have negotiated a deal to retain preferential access to the single market, as the EEA countries have, which would mean the continued use of Ehic.

Alternatively, the UK already has reciprocal deals with a number of countries, including Australia and New Zealand, under which visitors can receive free urgent treatment. It could agree similar deals with EU countries.

Will I need a visa to travel to the EU?

Again, while the UK remains part of the EU you will still be able to travel freely in the EU.

It is possible that the UK will accept the continuation of free movement in order to retain preferential access to the single market, in which case you will continue to be able to travel freely in the EU.

If not, while there may be limitations on British nationals' ability to live and work in EU countries, it seems unlikely that those countries would want to deter tourists.

There are many countries outside the EEA that British citizens can visit for up to 90 days without needing a visa and it is possible that such arrangements could be negotiated with European countries.

What about my EU driving licence?

Your driving licence features an EU flag in the top left corner with "UK" in the middle of it.

The information on it is the same as those used by drivers everywhere in the EU.

As with passports, the licence will remain valid while negotiations take place because the UK will still be part of the EU.

What happens after that will depend on the results of those negotiations, but one possible outcome is that a new design will be phased in as old documents expire.

Image copyrightGETTY IMAGES
What will it mean for people living in other parts of the EU?

During the campaign, there were no suggestions from the Leave campaign that there would be mass deportations of the 3 million EU nationals living in the UK.

There is unlikely to be any change to their status while negotiations on Brexit are under way and it is generally expected that they will be able to stay after the UK leaves the EU.

The same is true of the estimated 1.2 million UK nationals living elsewhere in the EU.

But while they are likely to be able to stay where they are, there are details that will emerge as part of the negotiations.

For example, at the moment, UK nationals claiming their state pensions in other EU countries benefit from annual increases. The same is true of some other countries outside the EU with whom the UK has social security agreements. But in many other countries, UK pensioners do not receive increases each year, which means that inflation reduces their spending power. It is not certain that UK pensioners in the EU would continue to get their annual increases.

Similarly, some UK nationals living elsewhere in the EU are entitled to state healthcare funded by the UK government, which would be open to negotiation.

'What happens to my Italian wife?'

A Reality Check reader gets in touch to ask about what happens to his Italian wife. "My wife has lived and worked in the UK for 15 years having come over from Sardinia, Italy. We got married in March of this year."

It seems unlikely that your wife will be forced to return to Italy - nobody has suggested there will be deportations of people already living and working in the UK.

If there were to be problems, she may be eligible to apply for British citizenship as she is married to a British citizen and has been in the country for more than three years.

Bringing booze back

Andy asks: "When we leave the EU - will duty limits be reintroduced? For example, will we be restricted to just six bottles of wine being brought back from our trip to France?"

Unless there is an agreement in the negotiations, customs limits are likely to be reintroduced.

At the moment, the limits for bringing wine into the UK from outside the EU is four litres
 

ROULLA

Registered User
Brexit: EU spells out procedure for UK to leave

  • 26 June 2016
    Image copyrightAFP
Image captionNegotiations to unravel Britain from the EU will take at least two years
The European Union has clarified the way the UK can kickstart formal negotiations to exit the bloc following Thursday's referendum.

It says Britain can trigger Article 50, which sets a two-year deadline for a deal, by making a formal declaration either in a letter or a speech.

UK PM David Cameron has said he will step down by October to allow his successor to conduct the talks.

But EU foreign ministers have urged Britain to start the process soon.

Since Thursday's vote there has been intense speculation about when, and how, the UK might begin formal negotiations.

A spokesman for the European Council, which defines the EU's political direction and priorities, reiterated on Saturday that triggering Article 50 was a formal act which must be "done by the British government to the European Council".

"It has to be done in an unequivocal manner with the explicit intent to trigger Article 50," the spokesman said.

"It could either be a letter to the president of the European Council or an official statement at a meeting of the European Council duly noted in the official records of the meeting."

On Saturday, German Chancellor Angela Merkel said the EU had "no need to be particularly nasty in any way" in the negotiations with Britain.

She said that deterring other countries from leaving the EU should not be a priority in the talks.

Mrs Merkel added that she was not in favour of pushing for a speedy withdrawal.



Media captionAngela Merkel: "No need to be particularly nasty"
"It shouldn't take forever, that's right, but I would not fight for a short timeframe," she said.

In other developments:

Mrs Merkel was speaking after several EU foreign ministers, including Germany's, had urged Britain to quickly implement its exit.

"This process should get under way as soon as possible so that we are not left in limbo but rather can concentrate on the future of Europe," German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier said.

His Dutch counterpart Bert Koenders said the continent could not accept a political vacuum, saying "this will not be business as usual".

Image copyrightAP
Image captionDavid Cameron says his successor will have to negotiate the UK's exit
Speaking later to the BBC, Estonian President Toomas Hendrik Ilves said he didn't think it was "even legally possible" to force the UK to speed up the exit process.

"I understand it is very difficult for Prime Minister Cameron, who was against leaving the European Union, to now go ahead and do this," he told the BBC World Service's Newshour programme.

"I think we should give them time; let them decide how quickly they want to do it."

He described Britain's exit from the bloc as "a disaster" saying Estonia had often aligned itself with the UK and had counted on Britain to present their shared views.

The UK's decision to leave the EU has sent shockwaves across the continent with leaders of Eurosceptic parties in France, the Netherlands and Italy demanding referendums in their own countries.

New road map
In response, some EU politicians have called for speedy reforms to quell further unrest.

French economy minister Emmanuel Macron suggested a new mission statement should be drafted and put to a referendum of all EU citizens.

"We've never had the courage to organise a true European referendum in its real sense," he told a conference.

"We would first build this new project with European peoples and then submit this new road map, this new project, to a referendum [across the bloc]."

The first summit of EU leaders with no British representation will be held on Wednesday, a day after Mr Cameron holds talks with members.

Global stock markets and the pound fell heavily on the news of the so-called "Brexit", while credit rating agency Moody's cut the UK's outlook to "negative".

What comes next?

Image captionThe process to take the UK out of the European Union starts with invoking Article 50 and will take at least two years from that point
Brexit: What happens now?

What is Article 50 of the EU Treaty?
  • In force since 2009 but never tested
  • Allows governments to notify intent to leave. Talks then begin on a range of issues between the leaving nation and other EU members
  • If no deal is reached, membership will automatically cease two years after notification
  • The article is only a basic template for leaving, settling the date and some other matters. It does not automatically include issues such as movement of people or trade. The latter could take years to conclude





 

Jane BM

Well-Known Member
Rocky road ahead!!!
 

Rosewater

Active Member
Hey , i was talking with my dad yesterday about unmarried couple being alone in the house , he said it's ok , as long as the lady is not under 18 years old... even if someone call the police on you , nothing would happen,
You get arrested only if there are many women are men in the same house ( Prostitution ).

so tell me who told you it's illegal for unmarried couple to stay together alone in the house?
 

Amr

Active Member
Any chance this could be a good thing for Britain?
I am not British but I can't stand the simple idea f Scotland or NI separating from the Uk..
I just can't..
 
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