Chit Chat about anything..

Jane BM

Well-Known Member
Any chance this could be a good thing for Britain?
I am not British but I can't stand the simple idea f Scotland or NI separating from the Uk..
I just can't..
It possibly could, it's just way to early to say to be honest, we need to see what kind of deals they can strike up over the coming months as far as trade etc is concerned. We could have started something though...lol...because I can see a few countries now following suit.
 

Jane BM

Well-Known Member
Hey , i was talking with my dad yesterday about unmarried couple being alone in the house , he said it's ok , as long as the lady is not under 18 years old... even if someone call the police on you , nothing would happen,
You get arrested only if there are many women are men in the same house ( Prostitution ).

so tell me who told you it's illegal for unmarried couple to stay together alone in the house?
It's more about unmarried couples cohabiting together, living together as husband and wife while not being married.
 

Aslemma

Well-Known Member
Hi Roulla, I'm glad this forum is back on line and, since the Referendum has now taken place, we can get back to considering its implications. I am saddened at the result, and even sadder that it is in many ways my generation who has voted this way. People seem to forget that things have changed since the days we ruled an Empire and we are now one country amongst many.

Time alone will tell how it will work out, but one immediate effect appears to be an upsurge of attacks against anyone perceived to be foreign. This must be stamped out immediately. Those already living here might not be forced to leave, but if they are constantly sworn at etc. they may decide they simply don't want to stay. I was at school many years agp and don't remember India, Pakistan, North Africa or the West Indies being part of Europe but they are getting the same treatment from these morons.
 

Amr

Active Member
Hi Roulla, I'm glad this forum is back on line and, since the Referendum has now taken place, we can get back to considering its implications. I am saddened at the result, and even sadder that it is in many ways my generation who has voted this way. People seem to forget that things have changed since the days we ruled an Empire and we are now one country amongst many.

Time alone will tell how it will work out, but one immediate effect appears to be an upsurge of attacks against anyone perceived to be foreign. This must be stamped out immediately. Those already living here might not be forced to leave, but if they are constantly sworn at etc. they may decide they simply don't want to stay. I was at school many years ago and don't remember India, Pakistan, North Africa or the West Indies being part of Europe but they are getting the same treatment from these morons.
I Heard some stories in the news lately about attacks on foreign residents, I have visited this country several times before and recently moved in here permanently , but I have never felt such a thing from any British person, nor did anyone I know.

I am neither European nor British, so if anything I shouldn't be concerned about Brexit, The European citizens have been privileged being part of the EU countries in the UK, while I have always had to stand in the Non-EU Queues in the airports or being asked silly questions about the purpose of my visits and dealt with differently in the Labor market and been less privileged everywhere because of my passport, until I prove myself .
But I still can`t feel less concerned about the economy and the future of this beautiful Country , with all the separatist movements everywhere .
I hope this turns out for the best to this lovely country and the British people , If you look to countries like Switzerland in the other hand, they are doing pretty well not being part of the EU, there must be a period of uncertainty here in the UK at first but things will be clearer after a while.

Speaking about the economy, some companies are taking advantage of the situation and leading a new campaign currently in my industry by approaching Consultants based in the UK to move to Vienne .
 
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ROULLA

Registered User
Istanbul Ataturk airport attack: 36 dead and more than 140 hurt
  • 26 minutes ago
  • From the sectionEurope

  • It seems to be getting worse. .
Image copyrightGETTY IMAGES
Image captionTurkey said early signs suggested so-called Islamic State was behind the attack
A gun and bomb attack on Istanbul's Ataturk international airport has killed 36 people and injured more than 140 others, officials say.

Three attackers began shooting outside and inside the terminal late on Tuesday and blew themselves up after police fired at them, officials say.

Prime Minister Binali Yildirim said early signs suggested the so-called Islamic State was behind the attack.

Recent bombings have been linked to either IS or Kurdish separatists.

Tuesday's attack looked like a major co-ordinated assault, says the BBC's Mark Lowen.

Ataturk airport has long been seen as a vulnerable target, our Turkey correspondent adds, reporting from a plane stuck on the tarmac in Istanbul.

There are X-ray scanners at the entrance to the terminal but security checks for cars are limited.

Media captionBBC reporter Mark Lowen reports from on board a plane stuck on the tarmac
Pictures from the airport terminal showed bodies covered in sheets, with glass and abandoned luggage littering the building.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said the attack should serve as a turning point in the global fight against militant groups.

"The bombs that exploded in Istanbul today could have gone off at any airport in any city around the world," he said.

The US called the attack "heinous", saying America remained "steadfast in our support for Turkey".

German Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere called the attacks "cowardly and brutal".

'Dressed in black'
Speaking several hours after Tuesday's attack, Mr Yildirim said at least 36 people were killed and many wounded, some seriously, with foreigners likely to be among the victims.

Media captionFootage shows passengers taking cover inside the airport
Media captionWill Carter, eyewitness: "We saw a flash of fire"
He said the attackers had arrived at the airport in a taxi.

Footage on social media shows one of the attackers running in the departure hall as people around him flee. He is shot by police and remains on the ground for about 20 seconds before blowing himself up. All three attackers were killed.

Justice Minister Bekir Bozdag put the number of injured at 147.

Taxis were used to rush casualties to hospital after the attack. Desperate relatives of those missing later gathered outside a local hospital where many victims were taken. Some expressed anger about the lack of information.

Flights in and out of the airport were suspended after the attack. The US Federal Aviation Administration initially grounded all services between the US and Istanbul but the stoppage was later lifted.

Flights have now resumed at the airport, but information boards showed about one-third had been cancelled, with many delays.

Image copyrightREUTERS
Image captionTerrified passengers were seen leaving the airport on foot
Image copyrightAFP
Image captionArmed police sealed off the area
Image copyrightREUTERS
Image captionA Kalashnikov assault rifle was later found at the scene of the attack
Image copyrightREUTERS
Image captionAmbulances flocked to the airport after explosions were heard
Image copyrightEPA
Image captionA number of injured people were taken to local hospitals
Paul Roos, who was due to fly home to South Africa, told Reuters he saw one of the attackers.

"He was wearing all black. His face was not masked. We ducked behind a counter but I stood up and watched him. Two explosions went off shortly after one another. By that time he had stopped shooting.

"He turned around and started coming towards us. He was holding his gun inside his jacket. He looked around anxiously to see if anyone was going to stop him and then went down the escalator. We heard some more gunfire and then another explosion, and then it was over."

Charles Michel, the Prime Minister of Belgium whose capital city was targeted by bombers in March, tweeted from the EU summit in Brussels: "Our thoughts are with the victims of the attacks at Istanbul's airport. We condemn these atrocious acts of violence."

#PrayforTurkey began trending on Twitter after the attack.

In December, a blast on the tarmac at a different Istanbul airport, Sabiha Gokcen, killed a cleaner. That attack was claimed by a Kurdish group, the Kurdistan Freedom Falcons (TAK).


 

Attachments

ROULLA

Registered User
What kind of question they asked you? looks like the tunisian passport is not welcome anymore :(
Hi Rosewater, hope that you are well! Let's be honest here, the Tunisia passport has never been top of the ranks in the UK, that's why so many Tunisian's get married and obtain a British passport as we are not restricted to where we can and can't go.
On the other hand, Tunisian's that obtain a Tunisian passport can travel to 65 other countries so it must be valued. I know loads of people that have been here only a short while and have got a British passport...
 

Rosewater

Active Member
yeah i know , such as hong kong,japan,South korea,philipines,seriba,marroco,libya,algeria,Brazil,Fiji island,turkey,barbados,haiti and many.

Dependent and autonomous territories
british virgin island.

China
Hong kong.

New Zealand

cook islands
Niue.
 

ROULLA

Registered User
UK considers easing travel warning imposed after Tunisia attack
Some security demands yet to be met despite Tunisian tourism minister saying she has received assurances of policy shift


Wednesday 29 June 2016
A phased lifting of Foreign Office advice not to to travel to Tunisia is expected to be proposed, a move that would delight a tourist sector almost wiped out by last year’s terror attack which claimed the lives of 30 British holidaymakers.

The lifting of the advice, which was imposed after the killing last June of 38 tourists on a beach near Sousse and warns against all but essential travel to every part of Tunisia, is unlikely to be proposed until after the end of Ramadan.

It would have to be agreed across Whitehall, and would probably be lifted in phases, with certain areas still subject to the warning until the whole country is deemed to be safe.

The impact of the Sousse attack and the ensuing travel warnings have had a devastating effect on the Tunisian economy, leaving some hotels with as 5% occupancy.

Tourism normally accounts for 8% of the country’s GDP. Revenues for the first quarter of this year were down by 51.7% on same period in 2105, according to the central bank. The number British tourists travelling to Tunisia, previously the bulk of its summer visitors, fell by 90% after the attack.

The UK security team has been discussing a 48-point checklist of changes that need to be made by Tunisia to improve security.

One outstanding issue is whether the hotels should be required to hire armed guards from private security agencies to patrol their buildings and grounds. Tunisian law only allows state agents, such as police, to carry weapons, and any relaxation of that rule would require legislative change.
The country’s tourism minister, Selma Elloumi Rekik, said she had received assurances of a shift in Britain’s position after she held private meetings with Tobias Ellwood, a junior minister at the UK Foreign Office, last week.

Ellwood travelled to Tunisia to take part in the anniversary memorial for the tourists who were gunned down at Port el Kantaoui, near Sousse. Seiffeddine Rezgui, the gunman, was shot dead by Tunisian police in an alley.

The Tunisian ambassador to the UK, Nabil Ammar, who comes from Sousse, has made a public plea for a change in the British stance, saying that a gap now existed between the “perception of the level of security, and the real security in the country”.

He said: “Every week terrorist cells are dismantled. Terrorists are arrested or neutralised. This should give a positive image, not a negative one.
 

Jane BM

Well-Known Member
Can't really see what difference it will make considering the tour operators have said they won't be going out there now till next year.

I'd also have thought that they'd want to see the outcome of the inquest into the deaths first.
 

Aslemma

Well-Known Member
It will make a difference in that it should make it easier to get insurance. Many of us would be prepared to use alternatives to Thomas Cook and Thomsons, even if it is somewhat more hassle, but are not prepared to travel without insurance.

I personally would feel less safe rather than more if the hotels used private companies to supply armed guards at the hotels. There is a reasonable assumption that the Tunisian Police and Army are fully trained, but with private companies I would always have a doubt, particularly if the companies concerned needed to recruit a lot more people for this.
 

ROULLA

Registered User
It will make a difference in that it should make it easier to get insurance. Many of us would be prepared to use alternatives to Thomas Cook and Thomsons, even if it is somewhat more hassle, but are not prepared to travel without insurance.

I personally would feel less safe rather than more if the hotels used private companies to supply armed guards at the hotels. There is a reasonable assumption that the Tunisian Police and Army are fully trained, but with private companies I would always have a doubt, particularly if the companies concerned needed to recruit a lot more people for this.
I would feel uncomfortable knowing that whilst on holiday there were guards with riffles standing watching, no matter where their from.... You only have to walk down Avenue Habib Bourguiba and feel how intimidated people feel just with the Black tigers,,,, and there uniforms are much better than the Tunisian police. I'd also find it quite intimidating. I don't see the point in going on holiday, I'd fear more fearful personally.
 

Jane BM

Well-Known Member
It will make a difference in that it should make it easier to get insurance. Many of us would be prepared to use alternatives to Thomas Cook and Thomsons, even if it is somewhat more hassle, but are not prepared to travel without insurance.

I personally would feel less safe rather than more if the hotels used private companies to supply armed guards at the hotels. There is a reasonable assumption that the Tunisian Police and Army are fully trained, but with private companies I would always have a doubt, particularly if the companies concerned needed to recruit a lot more people for this.
I would never recommend anyone ever travelled without insurance anyway....and there has always been insurance available, just at an inflated price.

However as far as the economy goes over there , until the tour operators start offering packages to the Brits again then not a lot will change, which was my point.
 

ROULLA

Registered User
Istanbul Ataturk airport attack: 36 dead and more than 140 hurt
  • 26 minutes ago
  • From the sectionEurope

  • It seems to be getting worse. .
Image copyrightGETTY IMAGES
Image captionTurkey said early signs suggested so-called Islamic State was behind the attack
A gun and bomb attack on Istanbul's Ataturk international airport has killed 36 people and injured more than 140 others, officials say.

Three attackers began shooting outside and inside the terminal late on Tuesday and blew themselves up after police fired at them, officials say.

Prime Minister Binali Yildirim said early signs suggested the so-called Islamic State was behind the attack.

Recent bombings have been linked to either IS or Kurdish separatists.

Tuesday's attack looked like a major co-ordinated assault, says the BBC's Mark Lowen.

Ataturk airport has long been seen as a vulnerable target, our Turkey correspondent adds, reporting from a plane stuck on the tarmac in Istanbul.

There are X-ray scanners at the entrance to the terminal but security checks for cars are limited.

Media captionBBC reporter Mark Lowen reports from on board a plane stuck on the tarmac
Pictures from the airport terminal showed bodies covered in sheets, with glass and abandoned luggage littering the building.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said the attack should serve as a turning point in the global fight against militant groups.

"The bombs that exploded in Istanbul today could have gone off at any airport in any city around the world," he said.

The US called the attack "heinous", saying America remained "steadfast in our support for Turkey".

German Interior Minister Thomas de Maiziere called the attacks "cowardly and brutal".

'Dressed in black'
Speaking several hours after Tuesday's attack, Mr Yildirim said at least 36 people were killed and many wounded, some seriously, with foreigners likely to be among the victims.

Media captionFootage shows passengers taking cover inside the airport
Media captionWill Carter, eyewitness: "We saw a flash of fire"
He said the attackers had arrived at the airport in a taxi.

Footage on social media shows one of the attackers running in the departure hall as people around him flee. He is shot by police and remains on the ground for about 20 seconds before blowing himself up. All three attackers were killed.

Justice Minister Bekir Bozdag put the number of injured at 147.

Taxis were used to rush casualties to hospital after the attack. Desperate relatives of those missing later gathered outside a local hospital where many victims were taken. Some expressed anger about the lack of information.

Flights in and out of the airport were suspended after the attack. The US Federal Aviation Administration initially grounded all services between the US and Istanbul but the stoppage was later lifted.

Flights have now resumed at the airport, but information boards showed about one-third had been cancelled, with many delays.

Image copyrightREUTERS
Image captionTerrified passengers were seen leaving the airport on foot
Image copyrightAFP
Image captionArmed police sealed off the area
Image copyrightREUTERS
Image captionA Kalashnikov assault rifle was later found at the scene of the attack
Image copyrightREUTERS
Image captionAmbulances flocked to the airport after explosions were heard
Image copyrightEPA
Image captionA number of injured people were taken to local hospitals
Paul Roos, who was due to fly home to South Africa, told Reuters he saw one of the attackers.

"He was wearing all black. His face was not masked. We ducked behind a counter but I stood up and watched him. Two explosions went off shortly after one another. By that time he had stopped shooting.

"He turned around and started coming towards us. He was holding his gun inside his jacket. He looked around anxiously to see if anyone was going to stop him and then went down the escalator. We heard some more gunfire and then another explosion, and then it was over."

Charles Michel, the Prime Minister of Belgium whose capital city was targeted by bombers in March, tweeted from the EU summit in Brussels: "Our thoughts are with the victims of the attacks at Istanbul's airport. We condemn these atrocious acts of violence."

#PrayforTurkey began trending on Twitter after the attack.

In December, a blast on the tarmac at a different Istanbul airport, Sabiha Gokcen, killed a cleaner. That attack was claimed by a Kurdish group, the Kurdistan Freedom Falcons (TAK).


Tunisian Doctor Killed in Istanbul Bombing Was Trying to Bring Son Home From Islamic State
Simon Speakman Cordallon June 29, 2016

Mozaique FM have reported that the Tunisian Doctor killed in the bombings at Ataturk Airport last night had been visiting Turkey to negotiate the release of his son, held for his alleged involvement with the Islamic State, (Daesh) in Syria.

According to sources quoted by the radio station, Doctor Fathi Bayoudh, Chief of Pediatrics at the Military Hospital in Tunis had been in Turkey for two months searching for his son, who had left previously to complete an internship within the country. He, along with his, (Tunisian) girlfriend had subsequently been recruited by Daesh and had left to fight in Syria.



Facebook images of Colonel Major, Dr. Fathi Bayoudh. Image Source: Facebook

A number of sources report that at the time of Dr Bayoudh’ s visit, both son and girlfriend were being held by Turkish security services on the border with Syria, where they had been persuaded to cooperate with authorities pending extradition.

According to a Facebook post by Professor Ali Gannoun, who had been in contact with the deceased, Doctor Bayoudh was at the airport to meet his wife’s flight. This would have been the first time Mrs. Bayoudh had seen her son in two years.

Commenting upon the case, Mohamed Iqbel Ben Rejeb, the President of the Rescue Association for Tunisians Trapped Abroad, (RATTA) an organization that liaises between the families of those fighting with militant groups abroad and the authorities said, “It is not unusual for Daesh fighters to come from military families of all ranks.”
 

Aslemma

Well-Known Member
[QUOTE="Jane BM, post: 328132, member: 8469
However as far as the economy goes over there, until the tour operators start offering packages to the Brits again then not a lot will change, which was my point.[/QUOTE]

Even when the tour operators do start again they really need to get away from the 'all inclusive' concept, as this does very little for the economy, only for the tour companies
 

gem15

Well-Known Member
It's a start and if getting people back into jobs and earning a living again I'm all for it.
 

Jane BM

Well-Known Member
[QUOTE="Jane BM, post: 328132, member: 8469
However as far as the economy goes over there, until the tour operators start offering packages to the Brits again then not a lot will change, which was my point.
Even when the tour operators do start again they really need to get away from the 'all inclusive' concept, as this does very little for the economy, only for the tour companies[/QUOTE]
Totally agree.....sadly though it seems to be more the way package holidays are going...and not just to Tunisia.
 

Jane BM

Well-Known Member
It's a start and if getting people back into jobs and earning a living again I'm all for it.
When tourists come back, that's when hotels can hopefully afford to refurb, staff can be employed and ultimately have a knock on effect with the local community and economy. As tour operators have said they won't be going back till at least May next year I don't see that changing drastically...regardless of the FCO travel guidance....
 

ROULLA

Registered User
Tunisian Doctor Killed in Istanbul Bombing Was Trying to Bring Son Home From Islamic State
Simon Speakman Cordallon June 29, 2016

Mozaique FM have reported that the Tunisian Doctor killed in the bombings at Ataturk Airport last night had been visiting Turkey to negotiate the release of his son, held for his alleged involvement with the Islamic State, (Daesh) in Syria.

According to sources quoted by the radio station, Doctor Fathi Bayoudh, Chief of Pediatrics at the Military Hospital in Tunis had been in Turkey for two months searching for his son, who had left previously to complete an internship within the country. He, along with his, (Tunisian) girlfriend had subsequently been recruited by Daesh and had left to fight in Syria.



Facebook images of Colonel Major, Dr. Fathi Bayoudh. Image Source: Facebook

A number of sources report that at the time of Dr Bayoudh’ s visit, both son and girlfriend were being held by Turkish security services on the border with Syria, where they had been persuaded to cooperate with authorities pending extradition.

According to a Facebook post by Professor Ali Gannoun, who had been in contact with the deceased, Doctor Bayoudh was at the airport to meet his wife’s flight. This would have been the first time Mrs. Bayoudh had seen her son in two years.

Commenting upon the case, Mohamed Iqbel Ben Rejeb, the President of the Rescue Association for Tunisians Trapped Abroad, (RATTA) an organization that liaises between the families of those fighting with militant groups abroad and the authorities said, “It is not unusual for Daesh fighters to come from military families of all ranks.”
Son of Slain Doctor Arrested and Transferred to Military Hospital
Najwa Youneson July 4, 2016

Anouar Bayoudh, the son of the Tunisian military doctor killed in last week’s bombing at Ataturk, Istanbul has been returned with his wide to Tunisia where he has been arrested and transferred to Military Hospital in central Tunis.


Anouar Bayoudh and his as yet unnamed wife returning from Turkey. Facebook image

Anouar’s father, Fathi Bayoudh had travelled to Turkey to secure his son’s release from prison where he was being held by Turkish authorities for he and his wife’s suspected involvement in the Islamic State, (Daesh) in Iraq and Syria.


According to TAP, Anouar became hysterical on learning of his Father’s death, necessitating his trasfer to the military hospital. The circumstances and whereabouts of his wife remain unknown.

A spokesperson from the Ministry of Interior confirmed to Tunisia Live that Anouar Bayoudh and his girlfriend, (wife?) had been arrested on arrival in Tunis by the National Anti-Terrorist Unit two days, but declined to comment further.

The manner of the Bayoudhs’ arrest and transfer to the Military Hospital have elicited significant comment upon Tunisian social media, with many referring to the seemingly preferential treatment afforded to the son of a senior military officer and his wide, which many have claimed is in sharp contrast the treatment usually meted out to those suspected of terrorist offences.


Amnesty International Tunis. Image Credit: Amnesty International Facebook page

Lotfi Azouz, Director of Amnesty International Tunis, said that the handling of the Bayoudh case was ‘unique’ in that “This is a first, knowing that the military hospital was never intended for civilians, but for military officials and their families.”

However, according to Azouz, the case did raise concerns over the manner in which those suspected of involvement in terrorist offences overseas were treated. Furthermore, “The case of Anouar Bayoudh sheds light on how the families of security and military personnel can be targeted by terrorist groups, (for potential recruitment).”

Azouz also questioned the applicability of the country’s anti-terror legislation, which was passed into law last year after the Bardo museum attack in March. According to Azouz, the legislation makes no mention of either war crimes, or crimes against humanity, specifying only terrorism, leaving suspects with a potential loophole by which to escape punishment.

“The country has serious problems in reconciling domestic and international laws. Tunisia still hasn’t clarified its positions with regard to the vote in the African Union to withdraw from the International Criminal Court, (ICC).” He added.

Last Month, the African Union voted in favor of withdrawing from the International criminal court, a move supported by Tunisia. According to human rights groups, withdrawing from the ICC will potentially help though accused of genocide, crimes against humanity and terrorism escape justice.
 

ROULLA

Registered User
Cafes and restaurants absolutely packed last night with people celebrating Eid. What was it like in your area?
 
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