Marriages with Culture/language difference

Milk

Well-Known Member
#61
Thank you for all your wonderful feedback. I totally agree with what was said about how it's rude if someone doesn't translate or speak in English when your around. Were I live we have a lot of people who speak another language and they don't care if their are people around who don't understand. In fact, the women will speak to you in english until one of their friends come to talk and then they change the language that they know, even though both of them know English...So Rude!!!

Thank you Jane! Yes, I am just full of questions and curiosity before I leave for my trip. I want to go with as much knowledge as I can.

I am trying really hard to learn french but forget it as soon as I have learned it. I want to be able to speak and understand to get by. I chose French over Arabic just because French is one of our national languages and more people speak it here. KheeKhee, good for you for understanding Arabic and learning it but not everyone has the same gift. You need to have a bit more understanding. You made a comment on how English Slang is hard for you to understand, it's no different for someone who is trying to understand or learn a second language.

For those curious minds. No, I'm not married or thinking of marrying a Tunisian man. I tried the long distant, over the internet romance and it doesn't work (for me anyway). I live pretty much on the other side of the world..Way to far!! I learned many great things from the relationship that I will carry with me forever, so am greatful for it. And I fell in love with a Country I've never been to..still have to wait till Sept to go. Couple more weeks left - YES!!!!!!!!!!!!

Take Care everyone and I look forward to future posts and answers.
 

Jane BM

Well-Known Member
#63
Thank you for all your wonderful feedback. I totally agree with what was said about how it's rude if someone doesn't translate or speak in English when your around. Were I live we have a lot of people who speak another language and they don't care if their are people around who don't understand. In fact, the women will speak to you in english until one of their friends come to talk and then they change the language that they know, even though both of them know English...So Rude!!!

Thank you Jane! Yes, I am just full of questions and curiosity before I leave for my trip. I want to go with as much knowledge as I can.

I am trying really hard to learn french but forget it as soon as I have learned it. I want to be able to speak and understand to get by. I chose French over Arabic just because French is one of our national languages and more people speak it here. KheeKhee, good for you for understanding Arabic and learning it but not everyone has the same gift. You need to have a bit more understanding. You made a comment on how English Slang is hard for you to understand, it's no different for someone who is trying to understand or learn a second language.

For those curious minds. No, I'm not married or thinking of marrying a Tunisian man. I tried the long distant, over the internet romance and it doesn't work (for me anyway). I live pretty much on the other side of the world..Way to far!! I learned many great things from the relationship that I will carry with me forever, so am greatful for it. And I fell in love with a Country I've never been to..still have to wait till Sept to go. Couple more weeks left - YES!!!!!!!!!!!!

Take Care everyone and I look forward to future posts and answers.
Great post Raindrops....:)...ooohh and i sooo resonate with not being able to retain what you are currently learning, language wise. xx
 

xtonicx

Active Member
#64
well said Aslemma !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
I don't speak much Arabic myself but I find Tunisian Arabic very easy to understand. I can often follow a conversation between two Tunisians even though i only know a handful of Tunisian words. Its very easy to follow a conversation as its very animated and picking up a few words here and there you can get the flow of conversation.
 

ROULLA

Registered User
#65
I don't speak much Arabic myself but I find Tunisian Arabic very easy to understand. I can often follow a conversation between two Tunisians even though i only know a handful of Tunisian words. Its very easy to follow a conversation as its very animated and picking up a few words here and there you can get the flow of conversation.
Hi Xtonicx hope that you are well! I know that people say that Tunisian is easy to understand but sometimes you try and listen and think that by picking up a few words here and there during the conversation that you have got the flow but it also depends because if they throw in a few street words that is when things can turn around altogether and what you thought you understood could be completely wrong, does this make any sence ? And as for pure Arabic then I think that this is very hard thats for sure. Good on you though for understanding Tunisian:)I think that if people want to learn Tunisian then they will but I also think that being in Tunisia helps quite a bit when you are surrounded by Tunisian people and listening on a daily basis.
 

janette b

Well-Known Member
#66
hubby speaks quite a few languages i only speak 3 english being one. I must admit though his french and german are not the same as mine ..i was taught at school for 5 years(compulsary) i do think the english are lazy as a nation as most countries of the world are english speaking we can get away with it. Because i could speak french and german i taught my young nephew to count to 10 whilst he was 2 he picked it up in seconds as most young children do. Learning at least one other language should be compulsary at school and the earlier they start the easier it is, pref 5 being the oldest to start. I lived for a year in tunisia, still dont speak much arabic but can understand more than i thought as i can follow a lot of conversations.one day i will have it mastered......she said hopefully.
A good tip for wanna be french or german speakers , i used to buy a newspaper in french one week and german the next, yes it took me a week to read it through but does help.
 

lynn

Well-Known Member
#67
hubby speaks quite a few languages i only speak 3 english being one. I must admit though his french and german are not the same as mine ..i was taught at school for 5 years(compulsary) i do think the english are lazy as a nation as most countries of the world are english speaking we can get away with it. Because i could speak french and german i taught my young nephew to count to 10 whilst he was 2 he picked it up in seconds as most young children do. Learning at least one other language should be compulsary at school and the earlier they start the easier it is, pref 5 being the oldest to start. I lived for a year in tunisia, still dont speak much arabic but can understand more than i thought as i can follow a lot of conversations.one day i will have it mastered......she said hopefully.
A good tip for wanna be french or german speakers , i used to buy a newspaper in french one week and german the next, yes it took me a week to read it through but does help.
Yeah your right about the British being lazy to learn another language, I have had a dabble at a few, my son in law being Iranian has taught my some Farsi and my granddaughter speaks English, Welsh and Farsi I think it's also easier for some and has you get older you forget easy..my brain is frazzled these days.
 

ROULLA

Registered User
#68
hubby speaks quite a few languages i only speak 3 english being one. I must admit though his french and german are not the same as mine ..i was taught at school for 5 years(compulsary) i do think the english are lazy as a nation as most countries of the world are english speaking we can get away with it. Because i could speak french and german i taught my young nephew to count to 10 whilst he was 2 he picked it up in seconds as most young children do. Learning at least one other language should be compulsary at school and the earlier they start the easier it is, pref 5 being the oldest to start. I lived for a year in tunisia, still dont speak much arabic but can understand more than i thought as i can follow a lot of conversations.one day i will have it mastered......she said hopefully.
A good tip for wanna be french or german speakers , i used to buy a newspaper in french one week and german the next, yes it took me a week to read it through but does help.
Hi Janette I don't know if you saw this piece of news which I think is great.:)

10 June 2012 New curriculum 'to make languages compulsory from seven'

Labour's Stephen Twigg backed the government plan for languages
Learning a foreign language will be compulsory from the age of seven in England's primary schools in an overhaul of the national curriculum, the education secretary is to announce.
Michael Gove will also say later this week that children as young as five will be expected to recite poetry.
There will also be a new focus on spelling and grammar.
The plans will be put out to public consultation later in the year, ahead of a scheduled introduction in 2014.
The proposals come amid concerns over a decline in pupils taking foreign languages at GCSE.
In 2010, 43% of GCSE pupils were entered for a language, down from a peak of 75% in 2002.
The last Labour government ended compulsory language study for children after the age of 14 in 2004.
Mandarin
Shadow education secretary Stephen Twigg defended that decision, telling the BBC's Sunday Politics the "mistake had been not to focus on primary schools first".
He welcomed the government's ideas, saying: "I think it's absolutely right. Children will get a love of languages if they start them young."
Under Mr Gove's plans, primary schools could offer lessons in Mandarin, Latin and Greek, as well as French, German and Spanish.
“Start Quote

There will be debate around what is appropriate at different ages”​
End Quote Department for Education
The Department for Education said that where English teaching was concerned, the aim was to ensure that pupils left primary school with high standards of literacy.
A systematic approach to the teaching of phonics - the sounds of letters and groups of letters - would be advocated to help pupils to become fluent readers and good spellers, it said.
Russell Hobby, general secretary of the school leaders' union, NAHT, said "reciting poetry and learning foreign languages are great for young children: both useful and enjoyable. That's why almost every primary school in the country teaches them both already."
However, he added that teachers should be given the "respect and trust for their experience and professionalism" to know how to teach these subjects.
"For example, we have to strike a balance between teaching phonics and reading for meaning and pleasure."
The plans are expected to emphasise the importance of grammar, setting out exactly what children should be expected to be taught in each year of their primary schooling, as well as giving lists of words they should be able to spell.
Pupils would be read poems by their teachers, learn simple poems by heart and practise recitals from the age of five.
'More rigorous'
However, Michael Rosen, the children's writer and poet, expressed doubt about what he called "government diktat".
"I detect in the latest Gove plan - as implied and reported - is what I'll call the itch to instruct and dictate to teachers and children because it will do them good, that teachers and children themselves can't or shouldn't choose, investigate and discover what is suitable and worthwhile," he wrote on his blog.
The Department for Education said Mr Gove was determined to make English teaching at primary schools "more rigorous" and was publishing the draft programme of study now for informal consultation.
A spokesman said: "Some will think aspects are too demanding, others that they are not demanding enough, and there will be debate around what is appropriate at different ages."
He added that public opinion would be considered and the programme redrafted before being put out to formal consultation later this year.
In May, a study commissioned by the Scottish government said children in Scotland should begin learning a second language as soon as they started school at the age of five.
 

Milk

Well-Known Member
#69
In Alberta now, where I live. It's mandatory for kids in Ju high to take a second language. I'm sending my grandbabies to French Immersion School for elementary. They'll have their french international certificate by grade 12 and have learned it flurentely by grade 6
 

Jane BM

Well-Known Member
#70
As far as languages go, surely the younger you start teaching a child the better?..at age 5 they soak up knowledge like a sponge..I for one feel without a doubt a 2nd language should be compulsory from infancy. I do remember that when i was at Secondary school you did have to choose ONE other language and take it to O level, not sure if thats still the case, just the same as you had to take ONE science to O level.

However they need to master basic English..:confused:..because our kids are coming out of school now with very dumbed down grammer, theyve totally lost the art of letter writing or being able to articulate with the written word...unless of course it is text speak....:eek:. Again kids are coming out of school with no idea as to the works of the likes of Dickens or Shakespeare or other great writers in history.

The list goes on and on...History!! how many of our children are leaving school with very little knowledge of our OWN history, never mind whats gone on in the rest of the world!!
 

gem15

Well-Known Member
#71
Hi Janette I don't know if you saw this piece of news which I think is great.:)

10 June 2012 New curriculum 'to make languages compulsory from seven'

Labour's Stephen Twigg backed the government plan for languages
Learning a foreign language will be compulsory from the age of seven in England's primary schools in an overhaul of the national curriculum, the education secretary is to announce.
Michael Gove will also say later this week that children as young as five will be expected to recite poetry.
There will also be a new focus on spelling and grammar.
The plans will be put out to public consultation later in the year, ahead of a scheduled introduction in 2014.
The proposals come amid concerns over a decline in pupils taking foreign languages at GCSE.
In 2010, 43% of GCSE pupils were entered for a language, down from a peak of 75% in 2002.
The last Labour government ended compulsory language study for children after the age of 14 in 2004.
Mandarin
Shadow education secretary Stephen Twigg defended that decision, telling the BBC's Sunday Politics the "mistake had been not to focus on primary schools first".
He welcomed the government's ideas, saying: "I think it's absolutely right. Children will get a love of languages if they start them young."
Under Mr Gove's plans, primary schools could offer lessons in Mandarin, Latin and Greek, as well as French, German and Spanish.
“Start Quote

There will be debate around what is appropriate at different ages”​
End Quote Department for Education
The Department for Education said that where English teaching was concerned, the aim was to ensure that pupils left primary school with high standards of literacy.
A systematic approach to the teaching of phonics - the sounds of letters and groups of letters - would be advocated to help pupils to become fluent readers and good spellers, it said.
Russell Hobby, general secretary of the school leaders' union, NAHT, said "reciting poetry and learning foreign languages are great for young children: both useful and enjoyable. That's why almost every primary school in the country teaches them both already."
However, he added that teachers should be given the "respect and trust for their experience and professionalism" to know how to teach these subjects.
"For example, we have to strike a balance between teaching phonics and reading for meaning and pleasure."
The plans are expected to emphasise the importance of grammar, setting out exactly what children should be expected to be taught in each year of their primary schooling, as well as giving lists of words they should be able to spell.
Pupils would be read poems by their teachers, learn simple poems by heart and practise recitals from the age of five.
'More rigorous'
However, Michael Rosen, the children's writer and poet, expressed doubt about what he called "government diktat".
"I detect in the latest Gove plan - as implied and reported - is what I'll call the itch to instruct and dictate to teachers and children because it will do them good, that teachers and children themselves can't or shouldn't choose, investigate and discover what is suitable and worthwhile," he wrote on his blog.
The Department for Education said Mr Gove was determined to make English teaching at primary schools "more rigorous" and was publishing the draft programme of study now for informal consultation.
A spokesman said: "Some will think aspects are too demanding, others that they are not demanding enough, and there will be debate around what is appropriate at different ages."
He added that public opinion would be considered and the programme redrafted before being put out to formal consultation later this year.
In May, a study commissioned by the Scottish government said children in Scotland should begin learning a second language as soon as they started school at the age of five.
Kids nowadays have little knowledge of their own language let alone a foreign language.

I remember at secondary school we learnt both French and German but that started at 11 years of age. Maybe if it was taught at an early age it would be more affective.
 

missmetal

Well-Known Member
#72
to be honest wth you i speak very good French , sure ARABIC and i have a middle level in ENGLISH so don't think my last postwere to show you that you can't be good no way but to let you see that's a biiig diffrence between dialect , words that your hubbys taold you about it and PURE ARABIC LANGUAGE !
Anyone can learn any language. Classic Arabic is probably easier to learn than the dialects because some of its mixed with slang as well. Bottom line, it depends on your desire and ability to learn. Chinese is even harder than Arabic, but people from the west learn it
 
Top