Tunisia Travel Advice Update

Essem

Moderator
Staff member
#1
Summary
  • Still current at:
    29 July 2015
  • Updated:
    15 July 2015

    Latest update: Summary – updated advice on departure options


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The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) advise against all travel to:

  • the Chaambi Mountain National Park area
  • the Tunisia-Algeria border crossing points at Ghardimaou, Hazoua and Sakiet Sidi Youssef
  • the militarized zone south of, but not including, the towns of El Borma and Dhehiba
  • within 5km of the Libya border area from north of Dhehiba up to but not including the Ras Ajdir border crossing
The FCO advise against all but essential travel to the rest of Tunisia.

Tour operators completed the departure of their remaining customers on 12 July. There are no further direct flights to the UK from Monastir or Enfidah airports. There are daily commercial flights from Tunis Carthage airport direct to London with Tunis Air, and indirect daily departures with European carriers. Contact your airline or travel company directly if you have an enquiry about your travel plans.

If you choose to remain in Tunisia then you should check that your insurance policy provides adequate cover. You should be especially vigilant and follow the advice of the Tunisian security authorities.

If you need consular assistance (above and beyond travel information) you should contact the British Embassy in Tunis.


There is a high threat from terrorism in Tunisia. A terrorist attack took place at Port El Kantaoui near Sousse on 26 June. Thirty eight foreign tourists were killed, including 30 British nationals. Further terrorist attacks are highly likely, including in tourist resorts, and by individuals unknown to the authorities whose actions may be inspired by terrorist groups via social media. You should be especially vigilant at this time and follow the advice of the Tunisian security authorities.


Since the attack in Sousse, we have been working closely with the Tunisian authorities to investigate the attack and the wider threat from terrorist groups in Tunisia. Although we have had good co-operation from the Tunisian government, including putting in place additional security measures, the intelligence and threat picture has developed considerably, reinforcing our view that a further terrorist attack is highly likely. On balance, we do not believe the mitigation measures in place provide adequate protection for British tourists in Tunisia at the present time.


On 4 July the Tunisian government announced it was reinstating the state of emergency, lifted in 2014, as part of its continuing response to the recent terrorist attacks. On 8 July the Tunisian Prime Minister stated publicly that further attacks are likely. The Tunisian authorities have increased their security measures but have also acknowledged the limitations in their ability to counter the current terrorist threat.
See Terrorism

Take out comprehensive travel and medical insurance before travelling.

https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/tunisia
 

Aslemma

Well-Known Member
#2
So basically nothing has changed. :(
 

kalie

Active Member
#3
Sounds like nothing going to be changing in the near future. They are all waiting for winter season to start :(
 

YOLO

Member
#4
No Worries mates , i hope everything goes well.
In fact , tunisia was much safer and much fun before the revolution ( Under ben ali's regime ) , I really missed those days :(
Now everything is f***ed up.
 

Hasdrubal

New Member
#5
Yes, it was safer for tourists, but the citizens were fed up with being screwed by the Ben Ali family mafia. Unfortunately, nobody can ever foresee the way these things might turn out. I'm hopeful that the country can pull through. There are thousands of Brits who would be there now if they were allowed to come and could get insurance. We are not afraid of a few mad people going around killing innocents. Falling into a pothole in the dark is a more pressing danger.The Tunisian government can start the ball rolling by providing medical cover (at a reasonable cost) in case I fall into the aforementioned hole, for anyone who wants to return before the UK Foreign Office gives the ok.
 

Jane BM

Well-Known Member
#6
Yes, it was safer for tourists, but the citizens were fed up with being screwed by the Ben Ali family mafia. Unfortunately, nobody can ever foresee the way these things might turn out. I'm hopeful that the country can pull through. There are thousands of Brits who would be there now if they were allowed to come and could get insurance. We are not afraid of a few mad people going around killing innocents. Falling into a pothole in the dark is a more pressing danger.The Tunisian government can start the ball rolling by providing medical cover (at a reasonable cost) in case I fall into the aforementioned hole, for anyone who wants to return before the UK Foreign Office gives the ok.
Speak for yourself......I think there's many people who are more fearful of as you put it 'a few mad people going round killing innocents' than falling down potholes over there right now.

60 innocent victims in the space of 3 months isn't a great record to be honest.
 

Essem

Moderator
Staff member
#7
And those are just the attacks involving tourists!
 

Aslemma

Well-Known Member
#8
Of course the attacks were shocking and it is quite understandable that people are wary of visiting Tunisia at present, but as one who has had many trips on the uneven pavements i can see Hasdrubal's point of view. Medical services in Tunisia are excellent and most tourists, even if they have no insurance, can afford basic treatment, but unfortunately the same is not true for a lot of the locals.

Regarding the difference now to what the country was like under Ben Ali, it should be remembered that Rome wasn't built in a day as the saying goes. After the revolution the people had high hopes that things would change for the better immediately but this was unrealistic to say the least. I remember seeing the euphoria in Sousse at the time, but this has obviously now gone and people feel let down and deflated. There is still some corruption though less than there used to be and jobs are still scarce. People who were doing reasonably well under the old regime now look back on it with nostalgia. The freedoms now enjoyed also gave the same freedom to religious fanatics which the government was too slow to deal with, and this has led in part to the rise of terrorism in the name of religion, despite it not being in accordance with the teaching of Islam as far as I am aware.

I sincerely hope and believe that Tunisia will come through this difficult time but it will need a strong and wise government which is able to balance individual freedom with the need to supress inflamatory imams and similar. It will also need good will and support from other friendly nations. This in turn will lead not only to the return of the tourists, but more importantly to investment by overseas companies
 

YOLO

Member
#9
Those who commit evil in the name of Allah...blaspheme the name of Allah...traitors to their own faith...trying, in effect, to hijack islam itself..
 

Hasdrubal

New Member
#10
Sorry, Jane. I was half-jesting about the potholes, but I've had quite a few near misses. Of course, it can be dangerous and that will cause people to be afraid. Yet collectively, as a nation of people who love to travel, we cannot be in fear of a small band of murderous extremists. We must stand up to terrorism and challenge anyone who uses it for their own ends. Surely it is our citizenly duty, as many resort workers demonstrated when they challenged the gunman at the hotel and on the beach. Evil can only flourish where good people do nothing about it. It might cost more lives in the short term, but we have to fight it. I sincerely hope the Tunisian authorities use all the help that is offered to them. Using special forces from other countries might backfire in the form of suicide bombers etc., but there are not many options open to the Government. If these extremists are not stopped now, they will slowly gather strength and make life miserable for ordinary citizens.
The causes of all the troubles are mainly economic, in Tunisia at least, and I hope the Tunisian Government are able to come up with realistic plans for using the country's most valuable resources, the weather and the good-natured disposition of the population.
How about extending the tourism industry to encompass retirement homes for the wind-blown and rain-soaked senior citizens of the EU. Think Florida, think Costa Del Sol, think Cyprus.
 

Jane BM

Well-Known Member
#11
Sorry, Jane. I was half-jesting about the potholes, but I've had quite a few near misses. Of course, it can be dangerous and that will cause people to be afraid. Yet collectively, as a nation of people who love to travel, we cannot be in fear of a small band of murderous extremists. We must stand up to terrorism and challenge anyone who uses it for their own ends. Surely it is our citizenly duty, as many resort workers demonstrated when they challenged the gunman at the hotel and on the beach. Evil can only flourish where good people do nothing about it. It might cost more lives in the short term, but we have to fight it. I sincerely hope the Tunisian authorities use all the help that is offered to them. Using special forces from other countries might backfire in the form of suicide bombers etc., but there are not many options open to the Government. If these extremists are not stopped now, they will slowly gather strength and make life miserable for ordinary citizens.
The causes of all the troubles are mainly economic, in Tunisia at least, and I hope the Tunisian Government are able to come up with realistic plans for using the country's most valuable resources, the weather and the good-natured disposition of the population.
How about extending the tourism industry to encompass retirement homes for the wind-blown and rain-soaked senior citizens of the EU. Think Florida, think Costa Del Sol, think Cyprus.
In theory I agree with every single word you say, honestly I really do....but a lot does depend on the Tunisian authorities fulfilling their end of the deal, because as you say, it's the everyday decent, hardworking folk who are suffering.
 

Selmi

Active Member
#12
Just had our November trip cancelled with Thomas Cook spoke to them 10 minutes ago and was told that the Fco has extended all but essential travel until February 2016 !
 

Selmi

Active Member
#13
We only arrived back on Saturday having travelled via Paris with air France all was well until we got to Manchester we were all detained seperately and questioned individual as to our purpose of travel to Tunisia we explained that we were visiting family due to the poor health of my father in law my youngest was really upset and got quite out spoken not the best thing to do at emigration however they were just doing their job don't really wish to go through that again !!
 

sass

Active Member
#14
I returned from Tunisia last week having spent 3 weeks there visiting various places, at no time did I feel threatened or unsafe, however, it's very sad to see the change in the 'atmospheres' of the tourist areas, I had no problems with any of my travelling. So sad to see the decline in the country's fortunes.
 
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